Session 4 - The Fully Informed Administrator: Distance Learning Basics and Best Practices - Free Educational videos for Students in K-12 | Lumos Learning

Session 4 - The Fully Informed Administrator: Distance Learning Basics and Best Practices - Free Educational videos for Students in k-12


Session 4 - The Fully Informed Administrator: Distance Learning Basics and Best Practices - By Lumos Learning



Transcript
00:0-1 it started . Um , thank you very much .
00:04 Or joining us . This is the fourth in a
00:10 series of presentations sponsored by Lou Most learning on various
00:17 aspects of distance and online learning with the goal of
00:23 making administrators as fully informed about these issues as possible
00:29 . So , you know , the goal of our
00:31 session is Teoh is to cover a lot of information
00:35 and also to give you a set of slides that
00:37 become reference materials that you can use any time you'd
00:41 like . And you know , so far , so
00:44 good . I think on what we've done and eso
00:47 we're gonna , you know , plow into this topic
00:49 today . The role of organizational structure and teacher training
00:54 on did our goals again or to cover the fundamentals
00:59 of supporting technology to deal with curriculum issues and strategies
01:04 , which we've largely covered in previous sections . Talk
01:08 about the challenges of distance learning which there are on
01:13 all of these aspects . There are challenges . Talk
01:18 about today the importance of organizational structure and make you
01:22 more aware of the issues and strategies available to you
01:27 relative to organizational structure . Talk about socio emotional support
01:32 issues for everyone in this period . Teachers , students
01:38 , parents administrators . You know , everyone's dealing with
01:41 very difficult issues and tow come up with focused solutions
01:49 for those of you who participate and wish to put
01:54 your your situation forward , that we can talk about
01:58 some specific strategies that you can use . Thio make
02:02 your situation better to improve your school , improve student
02:05 outcomes , etcetera . So those of you who have
02:09 been with us for the previous session's this will look
02:12 familiar . I'll just review it for a second .
02:14 This is sort of our clock of the whole system
02:18 , and you sort of sit in the middle here
02:20 in distance education and starting up the top . We
02:24 have learning systems . You know , l m s
02:27 digital learning digital assessments , um , professional development programs
02:34 on . Did you know LMS would be like Google
02:37 Google classroom ? We have delivery systems like what we're
02:41 using now , zoom other virtual classroom , um ,
02:45 systems and other classroom management systems and their numbers of
02:49 these and again , the previous programs on previous slides
02:54 give you resource off , enlisting them and telling you
03:00 how to contact them and explaining , you know ,
03:02 generally where they fit into the system uh , instructional
03:06 and curriculum systems . So this is curriculum management ,
03:09 instructional design tools . Um , you know , this
03:13 is , um you know , for example , like
03:17 like Lou Mohs or already , uh , management systems
03:23 . So these air school management programs , uh ,
03:26 tell you information about the students , uh , allow
03:30 you to communicate with all the various groups ? We're
03:33 gonna talk about that today a little bit and how
03:35 important it is to reach out to allow the difference
03:38 stakeholders on a regular basis . And then we talked
03:41 about cybersecurity , which a lot of people often miss
03:45 on bond . And it's important because when things go
03:52 south on on security issues , chances are the people
03:57 who are on this webinar are the ones who are
03:59 gonna get blamed for it . Eso organizational structure is
04:04 a tool that affects the type of pedagogical approach .
04:09 Um , it impacts the effectiveness of the organization ,
04:14 So this is a tool for being effective . So
04:17 the question you should ask is you consider organizational structures
04:20 , is which one will help me achieve my goals
04:24 the best . Which one will help me achieve my
04:26 goals the best . And if you know how different
04:29 organizational structures have different characteristics and I think at the
04:33 end of today's session you'll know that you can decide
04:36 what you want to pick . What you want to
04:38 choose , how you wanna work with it . Onda
04:41 Let's just talk about managing change a little bit .
04:44 Managing change . Why is this relevant to us ?
04:47 Because as we focus on going from in person to
04:53 online to from in person toe hybrid from hybrid ,
04:57 the online we're constantly managing a process of change and
05:01 change happens , Um , positively when everyone pulls in
05:07 the same direction . So there's no question about it
05:10 . You want everyone ? Whatever metaphor you want to
05:13 use everybody rose in the same direction makes a huge
05:17 difference and organizational structure as well . Talk about as
05:21 a major impact on enabling change . Okay , so
05:29 factors to consider in setting organizational structure obviously the bigger
05:33 school is the larger . The organization you're managing has
05:39 a big impact on the organizational structure . At its
05:42 simplest level , the larger the organization is the MAWR
05:46 levels you get to the organization also makes it more
05:50 difficult to manage and , you know , bureaucracy ,
05:54 which we'll talk about a little bit , is sort
05:56 of the ultimate example of that very large that you're
06:00 looking for a lot of control . So you put
06:02 in all these bureaucratic tools and then they drive everyone
06:05 when they're not working , they drive everyone completely crazy
06:09 . Yeah . Is there something on the camera not
06:16 able to see you ? Well Oh , really .
06:18 Hold on . Let's see . Um I don't ,
06:22 uh , like , um whether it's stole God ,
06:30 I don't know why . It was fine . I'll
06:33 let me see . Ah , wipe on sheep .
06:37 You better not let me try . Let me change
06:40 . Maybe the sun has moved in the sky or
06:43 something like that . Mhm . Mhm . It's back
06:58 . There you go . You know , seeing my
07:01 face is the most important part of this whole thing
07:05 . So that's good . Okay . Thank you for
07:07 pointing that out . Yeah , otherwise , you get
07:09 busy looking at a , you know , bad picture
07:13 . Okay , so the larger the size obviously more
07:16 levels , you know , working up to bureaucracy .
07:20 Leadership style depends on what kind of style what kind
07:23 of goals you have . So if you're somebody who
07:26 manages a lot through personal connections through setting examples through
07:30 setting a strong culture , you're gonna organize your organization
07:34 in a different way . Different structure , the numbers
07:37 of members in each of these groups , Um you
07:43 know , as organizational , um , managers , you
07:49 know , there's a span of control that's sort of
07:52 the limit to what people can manage , which point
07:54 it just overwhelms our brains . And , you know
07:59 , a rule of thumb is very difficult to manage
08:01 more than seven people directly . You know , indirectly
08:04 , you could manage MAWR . But if you're really
08:06 going intensively manage span of control around seven is where
08:11 you need to start looking at creating mawr levels .
08:16 Okay , curriculum depends on the curriculum you're using .
08:20 What are you teaching ? How complicated it is .
08:22 Um , you know what types of students you have
08:26 , whether they're self motivated and participating , the number
08:31 of programs again burdens the organization . The types of
08:34 programs the culture that you have are looking toe create
08:38 that you have on the one hand , sort of
08:41 open , uh , friendly . Um , uh ,
08:46 sort of everyone is , um , you know ,
08:50 sharing with each other . Or do you have more
08:52 like a military culture ? Andi , you know ,
08:55 finally , and we'll talk about this morning , two
08:57 minutes , mission , purpose and vision that you bring
09:01 to the organization . So let's take the next five
09:05 minutes , and I'm going to give you the fundamentals
09:08 of organizational structures . So you're going to get in
09:12 the next five minutes an MBA in organizational structure ,
09:15 there are fundamentally five types of organization structures , functional
09:20 product , geographical matrix and hybrid . Here's a functional
09:25 structure . The structures are defined by the second level
09:30 . So this is the first level . This is
09:32 the president . And the second level . How this
09:36 is organized is how the term comes to B s
09:40 . So this is by function research and development ,
09:43 manufacturing , accounting and marketing . You know , in
09:46 a school context , you know , this could be
09:49 I t . It could be , um , classroom
09:54 management . It should be enrollment management . It could
09:57 be , you know , logistics . So you could
10:01 organize it functionally . That way you could organize by
10:06 product . So a lot of companies do this .
10:09 So this is a company . Example is that's a
10:14 media company would have publishing , could have management systems
10:19 that it sells could have e commerce capabilities . This
10:24 is by product again . The first level down and
10:28 then interesting to see the second level down is by
10:33 function . So this is a product organization . But
10:37 the publishing division , the e Commerce division , the
10:40 management systems division are all functional organizations individually So you're
10:47 learning the the buzz words and structure geographical structure .
10:53 I don't think there's probably pertains to many of you
10:56 . But , you know , if you're managing a
10:57 large district and then you organized by schools and each
11:01 school has its own geography , you would be in
11:04 a geographical structure . So here's the president . And
11:08 then here's the US , Europe , the Pacific ,
11:12 and we could break it down further by geography ,
11:15 and then again underneath you could do by function you
11:18 could do by product . You could do , however
11:20 you want it to dio this a geographical structure .
11:23 Most organizations are hybrids , their combination of different ,
11:29 different function and product . So here's an example of
11:33 a company . Here's human resource . This is a
11:36 function , but right and corporate finance is a function
11:41 . Research and development is a function . But then
11:43 we have international division . That's geography . And then
11:48 we have this medical , scientific , electrical , these
11:51 air , all products , so this gives you the
11:54 flexibility to mix and match . To put on this
11:57 first level beneath you as the CEO , because we're
12:03 talking about your organization now with this is to give
12:07 you the flexibility to do what you want . Let's
12:09 talk about one other . This is a matrix organization
12:14 , and actually many schools use this , and I
12:18 think , as I describe it , you'll find this
12:20 familiar . So a matrix organization is means that each
12:29 person , so each person , occupies a cross in
12:33 this matrix where the lines cross . Each person who
12:38 sits here reports up to a vice president of function
12:46 and also reports to somebody by product . So this
12:50 is a dual reporting structure , so this might be
12:55 for a school as well , right ? A teacher
12:59 might be reporting to their vice principal , but they
13:05 might also be reporting to somebody regarding curriculum . So
13:10 make sure it's organizations are typically used for complex functions
13:15 , complex organizations that air doing complex , difficult things
13:20 . NASA is a matrix organization , right ? You
13:24 know , they're creating a space shuttle . They're sending
13:27 it into space . They need tohave people with all
13:31 kinds of functions , right ? You know , they
13:32 understand whether they understand physics . They understand building the
13:37 shuttle , they understand taking care of the astronauts ,
13:40 and then each of them have also . So you
13:44 need to have these expertise and then they get assigned
13:48 to product or the projects . And so I think
13:53 this is usually seen as high level , complex ,
13:57 expensive organizations . But I don't think it's so far
14:01 away from what you might be doing in many cases
14:04 , in which case , you have to recognize this
14:07 dual reporting relationship and the fact that people get assigned
14:11 to projects or products that are often on a temporary
14:15 basis . So as they finish one project , they
14:17 get reassigned to another project . Okay , so now
14:21 you know everything there is to know about organizational structures
14:25 . So how do you control within an organization ?
14:29 Well , you know , you have reporting structures ,
14:32 right ? So you have who's gonna thes air the
14:36 lines that tell somebody ? Well , I report to
14:39 Sally . I need to go up and report to
14:41 Sally . I need to have a meeting when something
14:45 is important . That's a reporting structure , and it
14:48 runs both ways . Span of control . I mentioned
14:51 you have tow , have a reasonable span of control
14:55 . If you have 50 people who report to you
14:58 , you cannot manage them effectively . It's just the
15:02 nature of , uh , limitations of the human brain
15:07 so set a reasonable span of control . Many organizations
15:12 have saved money by eliminating middle levels , which requires
15:17 the person above to now have a much larger span
15:21 of control , which they can't dio . And then
15:24 everyone goes , Wow , they eliminated middle management .
15:27 And now the organization doesn't work as well as it
15:29 used to be . Oh , so span of control
15:32 major means of organizational control reporting tools such as reports
15:38 culture Very important . You're the leader of this organization
15:41 . You establish a culture . People see that right
15:45 away , it translates within the translates through the organization
15:49 , almost immediately becomes very powerful tool . So if
15:53 your student oriented , if you're committed to your organization
15:57 , if you do whatever is required to do to
16:00 make it successful , people will follow that , and
16:04 you don't even have to talk much about it .
16:06 They'll see it . They'll feel it . They'll do
16:09 it , too . Management styles , you know ,
16:11 is too fundamental . Benjamin Styles . One is mechanistic
16:15 . This is sort of assembly line management . Frederick
16:20 W . Taylor , You know , from the early
16:22 20th century everything . You set it up . It's
16:26 detailed management . You report on every detail . Organic
16:30 is much more people , soft skills management control and
16:36 teams . Everything in organizations happens with teams , and
16:40 you need to build a good team dynamic . You
16:42 need to explain that you can achieve your goals unless
16:46 the people in your team are working together and working
16:49 with you . So here's what you end up with
16:53 , right ? So here's a you know , here's
16:56 an example of school and here's information technology , education
17:01 , technology and network services . This is by function
17:07 . Right then we have people who work for them
17:12 . So this is their team . This is their
17:15 support team . This is their support team , and
17:20 now we start seeing the lines begin to get complicated
17:23 . Well , you know , schools , air complex
17:25 organization . So not all the lines run up and
17:28 down . Let me say one fundamental thing and reading
17:33 organization charts . They are a table that has an
17:38 X axis and the Y axis . So I'm sure
17:41 everyone here knows which one is the extent . Which
17:43 is , though , why ? So this this one
17:46 x going horizontally is division of responsibility . So this
17:52 this person is doing network services . This person is
17:55 doing something else . And this the y axis ,
17:59 the vertical access is power . So this is who
18:03 has authority over others . So Lindsay has authority over
18:10 Harry Harry , authority over number 14 . It doesn't
18:15 even get in there . So you know . So
18:17 this is power . This is division of responsibility .
18:21 And if you think about it that way , these
18:23 charts become much simpler to understand . Here's another one
18:27 . You know , Now we're starting to introduce this
18:31 higher level , um , department bureaucracy that , you
18:36 know , it is above everybody Department of Education outside
18:41 the school physically . But now we have school leadership
18:44 . Then we have responsibilities here , the school managers
18:48 , these air like so this is sort of ,
18:51 um , function , you know , functional organization .
18:56 Here's the technology people . Here's the teaching part ,
19:00 and here's sort of the management systems part of it
19:05 . And again , people report up . So this
19:08 is power , and people are broken outside ways .
19:12 This is a functional divisions . Okay , Now what
19:18 happens here when you have a central office ? That's
19:22 , um , you know , doing its thing .
19:25 And here you are , school level doing your thing
19:29 . So you have these now we're sort of getting
19:31 to ah , hybrid organization . Right . So you
19:35 know the school . You This is you running the
19:38 school ? Um , running the school . You have
19:41 a guidance counselor . You have any learning facilitator ?
19:45 You have an adviser . They're all reporting , you
19:48 know , up to you . And in the central
19:51 office you have these parallel functions . So this guidance
19:55 counselor is also there's not a line here , but
19:57 there could be that shows They're also connecting to the
20:01 school counselor , starting to look like a hybrid organization
20:05 where you have this nexus and people report into directions
20:11 . This puts a lot of burden . The person
20:14 , his job there reporting to you there reporting to
20:17 the central office takes more time . You know ,
20:21 they're going to be requesting certain things . You're going
20:24 to be requesting certain things . Just be aware of
20:27 it . If you're supervising people who have other reporting
20:31 responsibilities like a hybrid organization , then you know you
20:35 need to be . What can I say ? Gentle
20:37 with them ? So you said a vision . When
20:40 you say things , that vision is the big picture
20:43 of where you're going . When you set this vision
20:47 and enunciated by saying things that I believe in learning
20:51 without limits , I believe in learning everywhere , ubiquitous
20:54 learning . I believe that our mission is to equip
20:59 our next generation . When you start saying things like
21:02 this , you create a vision . You unify your
21:06 team , you start the process of getting everyone on
21:11 the same page . Okay , how do you communicate
21:15 ? And who do you communicate with ? This is
21:17 what this now becomes the execution part of this organizational
21:22 tools communicating your strategy . So you need to communicate
21:27 this with your team with your staff , with your
21:32 community . And it has to be , ah ,
21:35 harmonized communication plan . Um , and this is a
21:41 huge burden on you . And here we've speculated that
21:46 there's a communications director . What's that person's job ?
21:50 That person's job is to make all this happen ,
21:54 because you've got 10 other things to dio , and
21:57 it's easy for you , toe . Let the community
22:00 engagement go by the wayside , even temporarily or not
22:04 to be communicating as much with your support step is
22:07 you should . So now you've got somebody who can
22:11 help with that . That's their job . If you
22:14 don't have one of these folks , well , you've
22:17 got to do all this and you have to be
22:19 cognizant . Does everyone know what they need to know
22:22 to be able to do their job ? Just because
22:25 they're on organization chart doesn't mean they know what they're
22:28 actually doing . Let's take a look at some of
22:32 some research percentage of teachers reporting that they were able
22:37 to contact all or most of their students and our
22:40 families . This is during the , you know ,
22:43 the , uh shut down and and you can see
22:49 that , you know , elementary schools , you know
22:54 , did you know did the best ? Um ,
22:57 you know , white , uh , students from white
23:00 families . White students did better than students of color
23:04 . Richard did better than poorer . Um , you
23:09 know , uh , you know , town in rural
23:13 . They're all about the same based on level of
23:16 urban . Yeah , urban necessity . But you can
23:20 see big differences here , and none of them approach
23:24 100% . None of them approach 100% . So a
23:28 big gap in community what you would like to do
23:31 with communication with your various , um , student groups
23:36 on what you act truly were able to achieve .
23:39 I'm going to hand it over for a few minutes
23:43 . Thio , the founding genius behind Lou Most learning
23:48 Mukunda Krishna swami . Because Lemos has a tool of
23:52 free tool that you can use to deal with some
23:55 of these issues to improve parent engagement . So I'm
24:00 going to stop sharing my screen and look , you
24:04 can keep it on Professor Rogoff it . If you
24:12 could keep sharing for maybe a minute , that will
24:15 be greater . Thank you so much . So you
24:19 know it's a big problem . And with home becoming
24:25 the center of learning on getting parents to support you
24:30 in your kind of distance , learning initiatives is a
24:33 critical success factor . And an important part off ,
24:37 like getting them to participate , is to really find
24:41 ways to give them answers to their questions or concerns
24:46 in a timely manner . So , for example ,
24:49 a mom might have a question about her child's homework
24:53 or , you know , privacy information In what ,
24:57 7 p.m. And as we saw in the survey data
25:02 , most teachers find it very difficult to get hold
25:04 of parents when the call either to go or though
25:09 progress or the questions . So let me show you
25:14 how our communication assistant tool can help you improve the
25:19 parent and even staff engagement . So let me see
25:23 if I can present my screen and he might have
25:28 stopped . Are you able to see my screen now
25:44 ? Yes . Okay . Awesome . So , uh
25:48 , imagine you have a little sert bought button on
25:51 your school website like the one that you're seeing now
25:54 , this little orange button and that can be made
25:59 available on every page on your website . And so
26:03 the benefit of having this is now the parents or
26:08 other community members visiting your site can start asking questions
26:13 . So as an example , you know when you
26:16 can my child have brakes during the that at home
26:21 learning , and it provides them that immediate response .
26:27 And one thing that's very typical is people ask the
26:33 same question in many different ways , right ? So
26:36 , for example , another parent may ask the same
26:40 question about breaks , as is my child allowed to
26:43 have breaks during a class right ? And the beauty
26:47 of this tool is that it understands natural language .
26:51 And so its able to answer questions even if they're
26:55 asked in different formats . No , What's more ,
27:02 uh , let's go ahead and ask your question that
27:05 is not in the database . So let me ask
27:12 a question like this that from a parent that needs
27:15 some good items on , let's say the person is
27:19 looking for I e . P support word , and
27:23 then they're given a response saying , Hey , look
27:26 , uh , you didn't find you an answer ,
27:28 but you can actually request an answer . So Aiken
27:33 put in my email address and request an answer to
27:40 that question , which sends a message to your communication
27:48 team so they can take a look at the question
27:54 that came in . Respond to that through the administrative
27:58 portal . So I'm going to quickly toggled to that
28:03 admin part . Just kind of give you a sense
28:05 off , but it looks like so it's just like
28:09 an email inbox . You are able to see the
28:14 questions that are here , and you can play to
28:18 the parent privately . But one thing that makes it
28:21 very unique is , let's say you think this question
28:24 is are a fairly common question . Do you want
28:27 to make it available for everybody in your community that
28:32 you can easily do by essentially adding this to your
28:37 database of questions ? So I'm gonna quickly do that
28:41 here . And so let's go ahead , place that
28:46 question and say on answer Might be . You know
28:55 , after your child logs in , you have to
28:59 go to my profile in the system that we have
29:03 , and then the question is off added , So
29:09 now the power of this is the The information is
29:16 now in your repository , so the next , personally
29:19 a website . If they ask the question about I
29:22 P , guess what ? They're gonna find an answer
29:25 immediately . Right there . So it's , uh ,
29:32 very simple tool , and the communication assistant allows you
29:39 to listen to what your community members are saying or
29:42 asking . You can respond to those questions in a
29:46 very collaborative manner so your communication team can participate .
29:51 Andi , you can build a rich database that gets
29:54 better or a period of time because you're adding questions
29:58 constantly . And the good news is you all have
30:01 already access to this , uh , tool through your
30:05 accounts that you have in the system . So you
30:08 condone certainly , uh , start adding questions , experimenting
30:14 with it . And once you're ready to publish ,
30:17 uh , it's very simply , you copy a few
30:19 lines of code using this embed code that's available here
30:23 . And if you share it with your website administrator
30:26 or you can simply added toe Web page of your
30:29 choice , then that ridge it that provides the the
30:35 answers to frequently asked questions is available to all your
30:39 community members . So that's a quick demo for you
30:42 on Lewis Communication Assistant Professor . Back to you .
30:47 Okay . Thank you . Very much . I will
30:54 stop sharing . Okay . Um All right . Terrific
31:04 . Thank you , Mukunda . Okay , so let's
31:07 talk about this a little bit . Leadership and accountability
31:10 . These two things air completely wedded together . Um
31:14 , you can't be an effective leader unless you're gonna
31:17 be held accountable and you're willing to be held accountable
31:20 . So you set the tone for change and you
31:22 inspire action . You set the vision , you propagate
31:26 understanding and empathy across all the departments . This is
31:29 this way that people learn from you through culture ,
31:33 right ? So you propagate this understanding and empathy .
31:37 If you are an understanding and empathetic person , you
31:42 show how the pedagogy can be enhanced . Um ,
31:47 with technology , um , you involved the right people
31:51 in team building , visioning task force , etcetera .
31:56 And you drive collaboration across all of these groups .
32:01 That's leadership and its accountability , because there are clear
32:05 goals and you have a willingness to be held accountable
32:09 . So what can you expect from everyone ? You
32:12 can expect that every person is gonna be a change
32:16 champion in line with your vision . They will .
32:20 They will support change in the way they do their
32:25 job to support your vision that you will identifies what
32:30 ? That you expect everyone toe . Identify ways to
32:34 optimize the learning experience within their own realm that you
32:39 will expect that they will define roles , responsibilities and
32:43 attributes that make them effective . Andi , that people
32:48 will be flexible . So irrespective of job titles ,
32:52 people can step up and fill gaps as needed .
32:56 No better example of this than last spring . When
33:00 s o many of you so many of us switched
33:03 online learning in a couple weeks time or less ?
33:07 Um , you want people to have the right mindset
33:10 , which is we're doing the best we can ,
33:12 and we're gonna do what it takes . The wind
33:15 . Um , the ability to execute this sort of
33:18 your job senses to make sure they've got what they
33:21 need to be able to do their job and evaluation
33:25 should be modified considering the needs . So as the
33:28 world changes , um , how evaluations take place ,
33:32 uh , changes . So processes in data , um
33:37 , you know , increase automation and embed security is
33:40 you move online . Organizational agreements should be considered and
33:44 reviewed data accessibility , acceptable use policies . And we
33:49 talked about some of this , you know , last
33:51 time needs to be reviewed , updated , and you
33:55 need to be knowledgeable about it . Higher level information
33:58 and insights , um can be stored on Do you
34:04 know whole issue of how you manage data , which
34:06 again we talked about the previous session and analyze data
34:10 to extended initiatives . So as you become a more
34:13 data focus manager , you learn from the data and
34:17 you learn what the smart next moves are . So
34:20 leadership defines the outcomes . It improves the student experience
34:25 . It better support struggling students . It provides this
34:29 ubiquitous learning environment , which is where we've come on
34:33 this . Um , it makes it easier for educators
34:37 to use technology . It makes learning more flexible .
34:41 It gets everybody i e . The community mawr involved
34:45 in the school , which you need because online learning
34:49 is we've talked about before . Takes more time ,
34:52 takes more effort from teachers than in class . Learning
34:56 makes it easier for students to connect with faculty ,
35:01 staff and the community . If this is your goal
35:05 and you put the tools in place and the organizational
35:09 structure supports it , well , then you can make
35:12 this happen . And ultimately it personalizes the learning experience
35:16 , right ? It makes it allows for more communication
35:20 with all of these faculty , staff , community and
35:23 students , and it personalized is the learning experience for
35:27 students . So this is really more of a reference
35:32 for you going forward that you may be able to
35:37 take advantage of . I'll just give a brief overview
35:41 off this . So these are the indicators over the
35:46 here off these goals . So if you want to
35:50 improve the student experience , can you check these boxes
35:53 ? You know regular attendance on sun until completion time
35:57 spent in learning of fewer complaints from parents and students
36:02 to skip down . If you want to create this
36:04 ubiquitous learning environment , have you looked at the types
36:07 of devices used ? And you know , there are
36:10 these , uh , tools , these software tools that
36:14 will give you this picture of what tools are being
36:18 used and how they're being used ? When is the
36:21 time of day when learning interactions happened ? So his
36:26 homework being done at 11 30 at night ? When
36:28 it's due the next morning at 8 a.m. How many
36:32 students are using devices on bond ? Make it easier
36:37 for the educators to use just to skip down here
36:41 ? Um , you know how many hours are the
36:44 teachers spent on online instruction and interaction ? The type
36:48 of online resource is that they're assigning to their students
36:52 . So this is the goals for you , and
36:56 these are how you can check if you're doing the
37:00 things that could lead to the successful accomplishment of those
37:05 goals . So here we've taken some guidelines from these
37:10 three respected sources Southern Regional Education Board , the now
37:16 or institute and in any A and this I'm not
37:21 going to read this , but this is a similar
37:24 sort of thing . So this is from , you
37:28 know , each of these organizations and these are qualifications
37:33 , professional development and credentials . And here are the
37:36 standards again , I say this is a good reference
37:40 list for you when you as a manager as a
37:43 principle as a district superintendent are working on these issues
37:47 . Go back to this list and look at these
37:50 standards and you'll see what you could be doing Thio
37:55 To achieve positive positive results . Here's this is about
38:01 communication interaction . So you know , for example ,
38:06 if you're looking to improve communication interaction , these are
38:10 standards such as knows that understands the need to define
38:14 the class interaction . We're both teacher and student knows
38:18 them thio developing your community among the participants . These
38:22 air really good , specific ways to train and measure
38:29 the people in your organization to see that in the
38:33 best way possible . They're working to achieve this goal
38:38 . And here's one mawr of these . So this
38:43 is technological knowledge , you know ? So the n
38:47 E . A . Says these are the standards .
38:49 Be familiar with online tools . LMS content management .
38:53 You go back to your slides from our previous sessions
38:56 , pay particular attention to the course enrollment process ,
39:00 demonstrate the ability to search and use Internet sites so
39:03 that links can be incorporated into course documents . Right
39:05 . So these air very , you know , operationally
39:10 powerful specific standards that you can apply and training ,
39:17 managing and and judging the people in your organization towards
39:23 the accomplishment of these goals . Okay , so let's
39:28 take a look again . This is from the Shankar
39:32 Institute . This'll is the people feel successful teaching students
39:40 . So this is what you probably already know been
39:42 written around written about is that people are not as
39:45 six , not as um , satisfied with the results
39:51 they get teaching . This this is with among teachers
39:55 . Um , this is there not a satisfied with
40:00 the results ? Teaching students remotely as they are in
40:04 person . I don't know that there's always has to
40:07 be this way . We don't have to accept this
40:10 because on two weeks notice this is what happened .
40:13 Aziz People learn the system as they apply those standards
40:16 on the previous slides as they become more knowledgeable .
40:19 Comfortable is the learning environment . Online becomes richer and
40:23 more tools were used . I would expect these numbers
40:26 will change , and this this will creep up comfortable
40:33 using technological tools also from the Shanker Institute . Extremely
40:38 interesting here . What does this say ? Basically ,
40:42 the MAWR experienced you are . The longer you've been
40:47 teaching , the less comfortable you are using technological tools
40:52 . Now , even here with people with 35 years
40:56 of experience , there's still more than 80% comfortable .
41:00 So it's not , you know , it's not horrible
41:03 . It's not like this is zero . Don't think
41:05 this scale is 0 to 100 scale . Here is
41:08 80 to 95 so you know . So there's more
41:13 work to be done . More experienced students and I
41:17 expect a love You know that , um so percentages
41:23 of teachers indicating current level of need for support from
41:27 their district's and various levels , so major needs strategies
41:33 to keep students engaged and motivated toe learn remotely .
41:38 So this this engagement of students is what drives people
41:44 crazy . It's clearly what's happened for a lot of
41:47 different reasons . Some of it is Student doesn't have
41:49 an Internet connection . Students , parents air not involved
41:52 in their education . Um , student was not really
41:58 a motivated student to begin with , and now they
42:00 sort of play the system so that they're not as
42:03 involved now as they were before . So strategy to
42:07 keep students engaged and motivated toe learn remotely . This
42:12 is something the teachers could share with each other .
42:17 They task forces with teachers and with advisers and with
42:23 administrators toe work on specific tools . To get this
42:29 number down is a key issue , Um , for
42:35 happiness with an online system , um , other things
42:38 that are major needs , but not to that level
42:41 . You know , strategies or resource is to address
42:44 the loss of hands on learning I e . Internships
42:48 and labs . So you know , how do you
42:49 maintain experiential learning in this environment ? Well , in
42:54 some areas , depending on the curriculum , it's a
42:56 little bit easier than others . But without question ,
43:00 some of this has to go by the waste side
43:03 in an online environment on gets replaced by other tools
43:08 . Um , you know , students creating websites ,
43:11 students doing virtual transactions with each other in a virtual
43:17 business . They're trading environment students taking over flipped classrooms
43:23 so that students are more involved in the teaching process
43:26 , guidance and tools for assessing students social and emotional
43:31 well being . We're going to talk about MAWR that
43:33 later . And I'd love to hear your thoughts on
43:36 this . Obviously , this issue is a significant issue
43:42 . Um , and tools and resource is to enable
43:45 counselors to support students s Oh , yeah . So
43:50 this is goes really to the heart of communication tools
43:53 s socio emotional learning plan issues eso you know ,
44:00 students feel isolated . They feel disconnected from their friends
44:04 . They feel disconnected from the teacher , you know
44:06 ? What can you do ? Thio Mollify that situation
44:12 . Thio Make it a Z as minimally impactful as
44:18 as possible access to high speed Internet from home .
44:22 It's interesting , you know ? Well , you know
44:24 , you don't have high speed internet , you're you're
44:27 pretty much lost . I don't really know what else
44:30 uh to say we did interviews with with principals and
44:36 district superintendents who tried to maintain connection with their students
44:40 who didn't have Internet connections at home . Try to
44:43 maintain these connections on paper and very , very difficult
44:48 , extremely difficult to dio . You know , some
44:52 of them really are heroes to the extent that they
44:54 were able to make that happen , opportunities to network
44:58 and learn from other teachers . So this is where
45:01 you , as a leader can step in and create
45:04 structures such as zoom meetings or panels or task forces
45:11 that operate virtually to allow teachers . Thio , Thio
45:15 interact with each other , so common challenges summarizes this
45:20 section a little bit for everyone . So common challenges
45:24 for educators , familiarity and comfort with technology for you
45:28 or your staff for your teachers incorporating technology effectively to
45:34 change teaching and pedagogy . So this goes to the
45:38 issue of providing people with training time management as this
45:43 . This situation of hybrid learning and online learning creates
45:47 more time demands . There's more demand for time management
45:51 by everyone involved grading responsibilities , as many of you
45:56 know , during the spring shutdown of in person classing
46:03 classes . Ah , lot of grading responsibilities were just
46:08 abdicated and , you know , schools gave everybody a
46:13 pass or they gave all the students whatever their great
46:16 had been up to that point . This is something
46:19 needs to be revisited now in the environment where you
46:23 have more time to plan student movement and progress managed
46:28 monitoring . And we talked about tools that allow you
46:32 to to do this tech tools that allow you to
46:35 do this Communications with parents and students again . We
46:38 talked about that in earlier session and gave you some
46:42 examples . Um , you know this , you know
46:45 , Lamos assistant that , uh , um , demonstrated
46:50 is a tool for duke for solving that problem ,
46:53 you know , or at least partially solving that problem
46:56 in a way that takes very little of your right
46:59 . Once it's set up , the question just needs
47:01 to be answered once . And of course , maintaining
47:05 a strong relationship with your students to motivate them on
47:10 but to support them during this difficult time . So
47:15 professional development initiative . So all of this boils down
47:19 . Everyone's got more toe learn . Everyone's got more
47:22 to feel comfortable with . So , as a manager
47:26 , what can you dio ? You could do these
47:28 four things . You can identify and adopt district wide
47:32 technology competencies and performance levels . Um , so in
47:37 other words , where do you stand now and then
47:41 what do you need to add ? So identify with
47:44 your strengths , Andi . Then identify your weaknesses and
47:49 come up with a strategy for filling those gaps .
47:53 So identify and implement a comprehensive professional development planning model
48:00 . So you know what the people need to learn
48:03 . How do you want them to do it ?
48:05 How can you do this in a reasonable period of
48:08 time ? People are not going to sit for hours
48:10 on end and stare at zoom screens , um ,
48:14 in , uh , or watch YouTube videos off how
48:19 thio implement . So , um , you know ,
48:22 aspects of Google Classroom , you need to make it
48:25 efficient set and communicate district wide expectations for the district
48:30 and the school based technology training and develop and implement
48:34 . So here we're going from goals to implementation technology
48:38 supportive delivery systems for professional development . Andi , this
48:43 is your job as a leader and a manager manager
48:47 . Set the goals and then , um , create
48:50 the tools to achieve them . So enhance professional development
48:56 to include So this is not just a curriculum ,
49:01 right ? Not just the times , tables or or
49:05 grammar . This is , you know , trauma informed
49:09 instruction , right ? You know , students teachers .
49:13 Um , you know , you know , look ,
49:16 150,000 families have lost someone . Thio Cove it many
49:22 , Many more have been impacted by it by people
49:26 who have been sick . Um , some with enduring
49:29 problems from it . So many of them have been
49:33 traumatized by this , and your teachers on administrators need
49:38 to be cognizant of it and need thio . Um
49:42 , put this , um , into their into their
49:45 curriculum into their communication strategies , team building and collaboration
49:51 among everybody . We've talked about that socio emotional learning
49:55 . So this is a subject for this team building
50:00 in collaboration . Among everyone is the focus on socio
50:05 emotional learning in the classroom . Where does it go
50:09 ? How to teachers and administrators also deal with these
50:12 issues Hybrid and distance learning . We've talked about family
50:16 engagement . This is professional development for teachers . What
50:20 can they be doing to engage families ? Mawr to
50:23 support families , Mawr , onda , technology and tools
50:28 . What can I say ? Go back and watch
50:29 the first to have our symposia that covered this in
50:35 detail and give you a lot of references . Hello
50:39 . So let me summarize some helpful him . Hey
50:42 , helpful tips . Helpful tips Say that six times
50:45 Fast , strong , ongoing communication from those at the
50:48 top . Who is this ? You . This is
50:50 your job Creation of teams to make . To support
50:55 this , to come up with specific strategies and to
50:57 make it happen and thio and to communicate your culture
51:02 from the top of the organization through it to everybody
51:06 . Ask teachers what they need , what this is
51:09 . You know , empathy is a leader . This
51:10 is , uh , ask questions and wait for the
51:13 answers . What do they need ? Not that you
51:16 could necessarily get them everything . But , you know
51:18 , sometimes you probably can or you can come up
51:21 with alternative solutions for them . But it starts with
51:25 asking the question and patiently waiting for the answer .
51:28 Acknowledge the challenges affecting day to day work . So
51:32 as again as an empathetic leader , you have to
51:36 acknowledge that what they're doing now is tough . That
51:41 this is extra difficult . Duty unions and district's can
51:45 collaborate and explore scenarios that are both budget conscious and
51:49 responsive to teachers and students needs . So this is
51:53 again involving everybody . The district , the unions ,
51:59 the pita , etcetera , etcetera , etcetera , involved
52:02 everyone , um and I got one point here that
52:07 I put in red in bold . If you can't
52:11 measure it , you can't manage it . So when
52:14 you do all of this when you do what was
52:17 on the previous couple slides , you need tohave an
52:22 accountability system where you're measuring what you're setting out to
52:29 do . And if you can't measure it , you
52:32 can't manage it because they said , Well , how
52:34 is the communication going ? Oh , I think communication's
52:37 going much better . Well , tell me what did
52:40 How many more parents , Um , you know ,
52:45 did you connect with how Maney Mawr emails did you
52:49 send out to your community ? How much more did
52:52 you post on your website about issues that you're dealing
52:55 with ? Those are measurable things that you can manage
52:59 and you can hold yourself accountable . And you can
53:01 hold everyone else accountable if you can measure it .
53:05 Okay , Some resource is for you . The slides
53:09 , Of course . They're available to you through the
53:11 most site on the way you signed on Andi .
53:15 If there's anything else that we can do either me
53:18 or any of the other team Lou , most don't
53:21 hesitate to call us . Emails asked us . Um
53:25 , so this is we feel we're a part of
53:28 this process and a part of the solution . And
53:33 we'd like to provide you with resource . Is that
53:36 are helpful ? Um , that's what I've got to
53:40 say . Do I have ? I'd love Thio in
53:43 the five minutes that we have left . I would
53:46 love to ask some of the participants . Thio share
53:50 their thoughts on some of these issues and raised questions
53:54 to shriek with horror at any of my suggestions .
53:57 Um , anyone wanna a mute there , Mike and
54:02 shit with the Group No . One Carla Cliff ?
54:21 When all your mix Ahron muted now , I hope
54:30 it's hoping that'll help mhm .
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