Session 2: Curriculum & Instruction - The Fully Informed Administrator - Free Educational videos for Students in K-12 | Lumos Learning

Session 2: Curriculum & Instruction - The Fully Informed Administrator - Free Educational videos for Students in k-12


Session 2: Curriculum & Instruction - The Fully Informed Administrator - By Lumos Learning



Transcript
00:04 welcome very much . We're happy to have you with
00:07 us . Those of you who participated in our first
00:11 session last week . Welcome back . Um , we
00:15 heard good things . So I guess that's why you
00:18 you've returned this week , we're gonna focus on curriculum
00:21 and instruction . Um , I think we put together
00:25 a lot of information in and out , and so
00:28 we're going to take you through that that process .
00:32 So our goals with this program is to talk about
00:36 the fundamentals of the technology that supports learning to talk
00:40 about curriculum issues and strategies . What the challenges are
00:45 , uh , the importance of organizational structure and staff
00:51 training , which we're gonna have more next week .
00:54 Socio emotional support for everyone . And we're gonna talk
00:59 about Maurin a subsequent session and , um , focus
01:04 solutions for people who participate . And so a few
01:09 people talked about last week that they would interested in
01:14 putting themselves forward as , um , as many cases
01:19 for us a part of it to get a solution
01:21 for them and to hear from people who are in
01:25 similar situations like you . All and toe walk away
01:30 from their participation with a clear idea of what they
01:33 need to do to move forward . So , um
01:36 and we'll talk about that more at the end of
01:38 this session . Um , and we'll be doing mawr
01:42 of that focused on you focused on your problems focused
01:46 on coming up with solutions to your problems in the
01:49 next several weeks . So anyway , let's get started
01:53 . We showed this useful wheel last week . Let
01:58 me just refresh everybody's memory . This is the distance
02:02 education universe , and we've got learning systems . This
02:08 is like learning management systems like Google Last classroom .
02:13 We've got delivery systems . This is like zoom like
02:17 we're using . Now we've got instruction and curricular curriculum
02:21 systems . This is like glue . Most are already
02:25 this . We've got management systems . This is what
02:28 keeps track of attendance and grades , and we've got
02:33 an underlying hardware system that includes security . Over here
02:38 , you sit in the middle of this baffling array
02:40 of options , all of which are complicated with many
02:45 , many options . But this is the world .
02:48 So last week we focused sort of on everything .
02:54 We sort of gave an overview of a lot of
02:55 things . This week , we're gonna dio dig deeper
02:59 into curriculum issues . So a famous quote that we
03:05 like Maurin curiously , from 1996 planned learning that normally
03:10 occurs in a different place from teaching and as a
03:15 result , requires special techniques , of course , design
03:19 , special instruction techniques , special methods of communication by
03:24 Elektronik and other technology , as well as organizational and
03:29 administrative arrangements . So here we are , 1996 25
03:34 years ago . These folks , you know , this
03:37 is almost before the invention of the telephone 1996 .
03:41 These people in 1996 gave us notice that when you
03:45 move learning , uh , to a different place from
03:50 teaching , you got a whole lot of issues you
03:53 need to manage . So the purpose of these symposia
03:58 is to help you figure all that out . So
04:02 this is a continuum from fully online curriculum , with
04:07 learning done online and in the distance and no face
04:10 to face component going through this continuum down to the
04:14 bottom , where it's traditional entirely face to face settings
04:19 with few or no online resource is or communication .
04:22 Uh , this is probably , you know , school
04:26 that you and I went to , um , you
04:29 know , paper and pencil sit at a desk on
04:32 day . Uh , that was , uh , you
04:35 know , no online resource . is whatsoever . And
04:38 then there's , ah whole number of options that get
04:41 you there , so , you know , way start
04:44 at the bottom , face to face . We can
04:46 add Integrating on integrated online resource is , um but
04:51 as an option , you know , not not required
04:55 for students to be online , we can have classroom
05:00 instruction with significant required online components that extend learning beyond
05:06 the classroom and beyond . The school day s o
05:09 this thing . Online tools follow the students home mostly
05:14 or fully online curriculum in computer , lab or classrooms
05:17 where students meet every day . So now we're integrating
05:21 these tools into the school mostly or fully online curriculum
05:25 with select days required in the classroom or computers .
05:28 So now we're much more in a hybrid world .
05:32 And then we get up here fully online curriculum with
05:35 options for face to face instruction , but not required
05:39 . And then where we started at the very top
05:42 , entirely face to face with no , with entirely
05:47 online , with no face to face component . So
05:51 you know , this is every single one of these
05:54 represents a decision and choices and that you make and
05:58 you make in concert with your staff and your faculty
06:02 So what are some of these questions to consider as
06:04 you make those decisions , And I'm just gonna highlight
06:06 a few of these , at least take some time
06:09 to review them in more detail and think about your
06:12 own situation . Um , later . So you know
06:16 , who gets involved while they're learning at home ?
06:19 Can't get away from this , you know , Or
06:21 their parents , uh , are their parents have the
06:23 time to give it or the parents capable of parents
06:26 interested or the parents technologically sophisticated ? Is the language
06:30 spoken at home different from the language of instruction ?
06:32 I mean , this is a huge issue in the
06:35 United States . Everywhere . Um , you know ,
06:40 I have Ah , I have a friend who's a
06:43 teacher in Queens , New York , which was ,
06:47 you know , a big epicenter of , uh ,
06:49 of co vid . But 60% of the people who
06:53 live in Queens , which is one of the five
06:56 boroughs of New York City , were born outside the
06:59 United States . So , you know , the primary
07:01 language of homes for a majority of the people in
07:04 Queens is not even English . Um , so this
07:07 has a huge impact on what you design what you
07:10 design , how you offer it ? Who delivers it
07:13 ? What you're expecting from people at home ? Um
07:17 , will there will there be a general or complete
07:21 shift towards online learning ? Eso Here we sit in
07:24 a decision point . Where ? How much online are
07:28 we gonna give ? Is this a permanent change ?
07:30 Even if we go from entirely online back , are
07:33 we going to stop it ? Hybrid . You know
07:35 , in other words , just to go back for
07:37 a second . So if we go all the way
07:39 up here because of school closings and covert quarantines ,
07:44 are we gonna jump back to something down here ,
07:47 or are we gonna slide down 11 step at a
07:51 time and add , um , toe add things to
07:55 make it more of a hybrid experience ? Um ,
07:58 you know , what's the level of digital literacy of
08:00 the students ? Obviously huge variety . Um , some
08:04 students , you know , they've had tablets since they
08:08 were two years old . Others of you know have
08:11 no no computer skills at all . So curriculum instruction
08:18 and design , curriculum , curriculum and instructional design curriculum
08:22 is the what ? This is what we're teaching .
08:24 Educational design is the how we're teaching it . The
08:28 what and the how okay challenges for implementation , ensuring
08:33 curricular coherence . So this is maybe your first or
08:38 second class about education theory . You talked about coherence
08:42 of curriculum , so ensuring curricular coherence across sections of
08:48 a course or across campuses champion a new pedagogy .
08:53 Are you going to introduce a new pedagogy and try
08:56 to make them all implemented and implemented well implemented successfully
09:02 ? Are you or how do you fully recognized faculty
09:05 contributions when they're individually authored ? Content is shared by
09:10 other faculty , so this is a big issue .
09:14 Who does the curriculum ? There's the faculty . Do
09:16 some of their own curriculum . Who owns it ?
09:18 Does it get shared with other faculty ? Do they
09:21 want it shared with other faculty ? Um , do
09:24 you want to share it with other faculties ? Do
09:27 you ? Are you holding faculty members accountable for their
09:31 use of online materials in a blended environment ? So
09:34 are you giving them materials and requiring them to use
09:37 it ? If you are ? Are you ? How
09:39 are you holding them accountable ? Are you assessing and
09:42 evaluating performance ? We're gonna talk about some tools for
09:45 doing that in a few minutes , and understanding the
09:49 technology will impact the instructors ability to duel this correctly
09:54 . Can they communicate with their students ? Can they
09:56 implemented ? Um , many instructors just don't know this
10:01 stuff . Have a lot of trouble with it .
10:03 Onda , we're gonna talk about training teacher training in
10:07 a lengthy section in the subsequent class . Okay ,
10:13 where do you begin ? Okay , but I say
10:15 here , but you already know this . So step
10:19 one , identify the most important standards and learning targets
10:22 that were taught in the past year . So where
10:26 are they ? You know what ? We're there .
10:28 What was where did you leave them off at the
10:31 end of the last year ? Determine which critical standards
10:34 should be prioritized and we're going to give an example
10:37 of this in a few minutes . And then step
10:39 two , you got to shore up what they where
10:42 They should have been , like , at the end
10:44 of last cycle at the end of last time ,
10:47 the end of last year . And you need to
10:49 map the content over a span of each week with
10:52 specific targets , learning goals for each one . And
10:56 continue to do this for a map that covers to
11:00 the end of the school . And we'll show you
11:01 the example of this , so , you know ,
11:05 figure out what you are trying to dio and then
11:08 create a detailed map to get there . Okay ,
11:12 so here's a coherence map . I you know ,
11:16 probably many of you have seen this and eso we
11:21 start off Where ? What did the students do last
11:24 year ? Apropo of these learning standards . Here's the
11:28 previous level where they where they were . These become
11:33 the foundational standards for next years worth it now ,
11:36 this year's learning and where do we want to get
11:40 them next year ? We wanna master these standards .
11:44 These become the dependent . He's become the foundational ,
11:48 and then we have the priorities that are key to
11:52 getting us from the previous the next . So what
11:58 makes this a priority is that you can't master these
12:02 three without having mastered this . This makes it a
12:06 priority . You cannot have . You cannot move to
12:09 the next level unless you've mastered the priority standards Here
12:15 . Down here is an example of one that's a
12:17 low dependency . So first of all , there's only
12:20 one learning goal at the next level . Up here
12:22 , there are three . Um , here there's 11
12:26 priority standard that's weekly connected to another one . So
12:31 this becomes disproportionately important . I e it becomes a
12:36 priority for us . Okay . S Oh , this
12:40 is just the low dependency example in the larger format
12:44 . Okay , so curriculum development , you know .
12:48 So here's a standard definition is defined in the widest
12:51 sense to include everything . Dad shapes the students learning
12:57 experience . So this is the technology , the pedagogy
13:00 , the community . We don't leave this out .
13:03 This is really foundational to curriculum development and the curriculum
13:08 for an online instruction . Unlike traditional face to face
13:12 curriculum , must consider what the expectations for the student
13:15 participation assignments and pacing in advance . So what are
13:21 you expecting the students to do ? What are you
13:25 expecting the students to Dio ? We've got all of
13:28 this mixed together here in our funnel . But we
13:32 don't come out with something in the final analysis until
13:37 we've made a clear understanding of what we're expecting from
13:41 the students . So here's some options so you can
13:48 buy outside curriculum eso the benefits of that . Um
13:53 , you know , this is , um you know
13:56 , this is , uh you know , like like
13:58 blue . Most . Like I ready is that you
14:00 know , they have specialized writers . They have specialized
14:03 instructors . They have developers , technology , people .
14:07 They offer a wide variety of curriculum and courses ,
14:10 mawr user testing and user feedback . So you know
14:14 , they've been through a round of beta testing multiple
14:17 rounds of beta testing and there constantly revising , updating
14:22 their curriculum . On the other hand , you could
14:25 build it internally , and there are pluses to that
14:28 . What are those ? Well , you can ensure
14:30 proper alignment with state and district standards , so every
14:34 state is different from every other state district . They're
14:36 different from each other from other district's , um ,
14:39 you can MAWR incorporate the teachers and their input into
14:43 the process . It's cost effective if teachers air .
14:46 Doing this is part of their regular workload , and
14:49 you're not paying extra for it . Um , it's
14:52 an opportunity to incorporate specific instructional philosophies . So if
14:57 your school your program has a specific philosophy of education
15:01 and you want to apply it to all your curriculum
15:04 , better to build it yourself to be ableto make
15:07 that happen . You need to maintain quality short prince
15:13 , so everything in education has multiple review , multiple
15:16 levels of reviews , right ? So we have peer
15:20 reviews , we have administrative reviews . We have district
15:24 reviews , we have state reviews . We have association
15:28 reviews . I mean , you know , there's numbers
15:30 of levels of reviews . So here is some of
15:34 the , um , reviews that you will have to
15:39 go through with your curriculum in your program , obviously
15:42 , local administrators , which maybe you are doing the
15:45 review . Peer review teams are reviewing curriculum reviewing specific
15:51 Teacher Performance District curriculum District's may have their own curriculum
15:55 teams , which come and visit you . Subject matter
15:58 specialists will look at what you're offering and then external
16:02 reviews . External experts and the , you know ,
16:05 system of education is largely driven by external reviewers who
16:12 were regarded as experts to pass judgment on the work
16:16 that we're doing . Uh , courses then have to
16:19 be approved by the state Department of Education . Everyone
16:22 knows this is like major headache material . Uh ,
16:25 students have to complete the end of module surveys .
16:29 You know where they engage . Did they like it
16:31 ? Um , how much work did they do ?
16:33 What great did they expect of these kinds of questions
16:36 ? You're gonna do requests for proposals for course development
16:40 that describe instructional theories that God guide the online course
16:44 specifications and you can evaluate courses using , um ,
16:50 here's a , you know , book all about essential
16:53 principles of qualities uh , specifically designed for guidelines for
16:57 Web Web based courses for middle and high school students
17:01 . It's a good , good reference . So the
17:04 curriculum design process ends up being like these bricks .
17:10 We start with the vision , we determine what your
17:13 intention is . We go to number to outline ,
17:16 researching Oh , go to number to outline overarching topics
17:23 . What are we What are we covering ? We
17:26 review the current curriculum . We organize our standards .
17:30 Now this is beginning to look like that chart with
17:32 the arrows . Organize our standards . We write the
17:35 lessons we create an attach , a variety of assessments
17:39 to each of them . We determine the materials and
17:43 the resource is needed . And then we go back
17:46 and we put it all together . And the last
17:49 thing is , and it's not here , it will
17:52 be on subsequent charts . Is feedback all of this
17:56 ? All of this process is a big loop ,
18:00 so the process of managing anything is setting goals ,
18:04 monitoring results and giving feedback anything . Whether you're managing
18:10 teachers , you're managing the cafeteria , you're managing your
18:14 curriculum . So to simplify it to its most fundamental
18:19 , you're setting goals , monitoring results and giving feedback
18:24 and the feedback is the loop here , and none
18:27 of this works . Without that , management does not
18:31 work without feedback . I'm sure many of you have
18:36 had bosses who didn't like giving feedback , you know
18:40 , after all , it can lead toe sometimes unpleasant
18:43 conversations or difficult conversations , and so they sort of
18:47 skip that step . When they skip that step ,
18:50 they destroy the whole process . It's useless . So
18:53 instructional design . Torsten and Postlewait said . The term
18:57 instructional design describes the complete process of analyzing what is
19:02 to be taught , how it is to be taught
19:05 , conducting try out . So this is the beta
19:08 testing in today's language and assessing whether the learner learned
19:14 it so assessing . So this is that feedback loop
19:18 instructional design as the feedback loop , Um , it
19:22 plays an important role in bridging tech pedagogy and technology
19:26 , which the way we see it have merging in
19:29 tow . One big one big process focuses on the
19:34 most effective way to present the content , and it
19:36 gives structure to the students process of working through the
19:40 course material on this is part of those bricks ,
19:45 laying it out step by step in small chunks .
19:49 Okay , so popular instructional materials for this models for
19:53 distance learning . Uh , the adding model . Um
19:57 , these air , I would say I'm gonna We're
20:00 gonna show three or four models . Fundamentally . Very
20:02 similar . Uh , depends how you like to visualize
20:06 it yourself . People think of these things in different
20:08 ways that you everyone learns in it a different way
20:11 . And we conceptualize these things in a different way
20:13 . So you know , you should think about it
20:16 . Find find one of these that seems comfortable to
20:19 you and use it . So this is we start
20:21 with analysis , design , development . So this is
20:25 General , you know , this is more overall design
20:29 . This is more specific than we implement it .
20:33 And then we evaluated . And then we give the
20:36 feedback . We go back and we start all over
20:39 again . Here's another way of looking at it The
20:42 assure model we analyze the learners , we stayed the
20:45 objectives We select the methods we utilize the material on
20:50 the media . We require the learners participation . Remember
20:55 we said early on , when you start the process
20:57 , what are you expecting the students to do ?
21:00 How much time and what what specifically are you expecting
21:05 them to dio and then evaluate and revise ? This
21:09 is the feedback loop and hear the feedback loop in
21:12 this visual presentation is extremely clear . It's just a
21:15 big circle and you're constantly going around . And presumably
21:20 , every time you loop around , you get you
21:23 make it better . And then here's a little bit
21:26 more complex way of looking at this s o this
21:31 model called the Camp Model . We start with the
21:35 problems we go toe learning characteristics . We analyze the
21:38 task , We have instructional objectives . We now sequence
21:43 the content . We make it specific with strategies .
21:46 We designed the message , How we gonna deliver it
21:49 ? This is where the technology comes in . We
21:53 evaluated , and we do this whole thing again .
21:57 If you look at these outside rings planning , implementation
22:01 , managing support services and then we start again if
22:05 we do it , we look at the internal ring
22:07 , we revise , we evaluate . We , um
22:13 , of evaluate , uh , in a formative way
22:18 . And we have a confirm a tive evaluation ,
22:20 so we're constantly revising it . So we're doing these
22:25 processes and on the outside and we are reviewing and
22:31 evaluating on the inside loop and you know , all
22:34 of these more or less saying the same general points
22:37 in different ways . Um , you know , use
22:39 what's useful to you , use what's useful to you
22:42 and your teachers , so content and materials . So
22:46 million's of options . Last week we give ah Riel
22:51 menu of options for all kinds of parts related to
22:55 the the distance . Learning online , learning from the
22:59 curriculum , tools to the technology to cybersecurity . And
23:04 you know . So here you have this riel giant
23:08 menu to choose from , you know , print instructional
23:11 materials , digital instructional materials . Open educational resource is
23:15 of which there are lots of them and many of
23:18 them very , very good . Many of these open
23:21 and and I would say , open being free educational
23:24 resource is what your mode is . And then what's
23:28 the library collection ? And , you know , when
23:31 I see this list , it reminds me of a
23:36 conversation I had with a fellow who owned the number
23:40 of restaurants , have done this for a number of
23:42 years , have been in the restaurant business for a
23:44 number of years , was very successful . He was
23:47 talking about growing his business in a class of mine
23:52 , and he made the following point , and the
23:56 point was this . The food is the least important
24:00 part , he said , Doing good food , providing
24:04 good food , finding a good chef , he said
24:07 . That's easy , he said . I can change
24:09 the menu in a day . I can have a
24:11 restaurant that's the Italian restaurant on Tuesday , and by
24:16 the end of the week I can have it be
24:19 a Chinese restaurant or a Mexican restaurant or any format
24:24 that you want , he said . The food is
24:26 the easy part , he said . After all ,
24:28 he says , and I always remember this , he
24:29 says , If you want good food , go to
24:31 your mother's house . You know she cooked food for
24:33 you the way you liked it , the way you
24:36 remember . That's evocative of of your family and of
24:40 your of when you were young , he said .
24:43 It's the food is the least of it . It's
24:46 all the other things that go around it . It's
24:49 the lighting . It's the noise level . It's the
24:52 manners of the wait staff . It's the price points
24:58 . Um , it's the , you know , atmosphere
25:02 . It's the location it's parking on and on ,
25:06 he said . These are the issues that really determine
25:09 whether a place is successful . So I make this
25:13 challenge to you is that it's easy for us .
25:17 in education toe focus on the education tools , you
25:21 know , toe focus on the multiplication table . But
25:24 you know what the multiplication table is ? The multiplication
25:28 table , the learning experience , the grating experience .
25:32 Whether or not you're effective at teaching somebody , are
25:36 all these other things that surrounded . So this is
25:41 the atmosphere . This is the technology . This is
25:44 how you test . This is how how you're evaluating
25:47 this is whether you have students , work in teams
25:50 or work individually . All these other things determine whether
25:54 it's engaging . It's fun , it's effective , and
25:57 you're managing it for success . The multiplication table is
26:01 a little bit like , you know , the chicken
26:04 Parmesan on the table . It is what it is
26:07 . It's not that hard to do , but it's
26:10 all the things around it that make it a good
26:12 experience and effective and make it successful . So I
26:16 don't know . Think of yourself is a restaurant tour
26:19 , maybe rather than an educator and you're providing an
26:24 experience . And , of course , we all feel
26:26 sorry for anybody in the restaurant business today . So
26:30 factors to consider feasibility of implementation of a hybrid model
26:35 . Lerner What are we asking of learner ? Interactivity
26:40 ? Are we asking learners interact with the content to
26:43 interact with the instructor to interact with other learners .
26:47 Are we supporting them with devices with connectivity with adult
26:52 supervision other than the teachers with peer interaction with a
26:56 conducive environment ? Um , you know , this is
26:59 such an important issue . You know , people need
27:02 spaces on environments that are conducive . Thio learning again
27:07 . Maybe a little bit like our restaurant Example .
27:10 The environment is critically important , of course , deployment
27:14 , deployment , platform capabilities . Um , you know
27:18 what ? What does the platform deliver ? And then
27:21 , of course , we in a way , we
27:23 start with analyzing the learner characteristics . Um , you
27:27 know , who are they ? What are their demographics
27:30 ? What are their backgrounds ? What are their learning
27:32 styles ? Individually and collectively , this is , of
27:38 course , complex . And this is why making these
27:42 decisions Doing these evaluations , coming up with plans ,
27:45 implementing them , take somebody who is extremely capable .
27:50 Alright , special populations that we should note , You
27:53 know , students who are on I e . P
27:55 s needs special attention . You know , this also
27:58 plays havoc with your with your budget and planning ,
28:01 but they need to be taken care of . Um
28:04 , English language learners also special needs students who need
28:09 multi tiered systems of support and students without devices and
28:14 connectivity . These special populations require special attention special programs
28:22 . And , uh , special allocations of resource is
28:26 to make them as effective learners as , uh ,
28:31 the general population . Let me take . We're gonna
28:35 take one second . Lemos has created a distance learning
28:40 kit , which is a very cool resource . Um
28:46 , for for teachers and administrators , um , it's
28:51 really and artificial intelligence tool . Uh , that may
28:59 remind you of things you see in other places .
29:02 Maybe banks , or on , uh um , you
29:06 know , Microsoft website . And so we're just gonna
29:09 take a couple minutes because Mukunda Christian Swami , who
29:13 is the founder and CEO of of Lou Mohs ,
29:18 could do a better job of explaining it , uh
29:21 , more clearly than I can . So , Mukunda
29:25 , can you take over for a minute and go
29:27 through this with everyone ? Thank you , professor .
29:29 Really happy to see uh uh , you know ,
29:33 a lot of you come back and then popular will
29:35 have a great discussion as well . So , as
29:38 you know , in the last two sessions itself ,
29:41 we've seen there is lots of information around this topic
29:45 . Off distance learning . Andi , I bet like
29:49 a lot of these questions are running through your head
29:51 . As you mean . We're thinking about different aspects
29:54 of distance learning from what does the acronym Addy stand
29:59 for ? Two . How to do something in Google
30:02 classroom , right ? There's , like tons of questions
30:05 , and it's a very common problem . And ,
30:08 uh , no educator can keep up with all this
30:10 information that's , you know , coming out . And
30:14 , uh , so to address this issue , we
30:18 started this , You know , an interactive distance learning
30:22 database off frequently asked questions around this topic . So
30:28 let me quickly show you how it works . Professor
30:31 , if you could click on that hyperlink on distance
30:34 learning . Okay , so on this web page ,
30:39 if you could scroll down a bit , uh ,
30:42 there is a search box , just like , you
30:43 know , Google Search . You could easily look at
30:49 the list of frequently asked questions , and they're organized
30:53 by different topics such as curriculum , hardware , network
30:57 and many of the things that you're hearing in Professor
31:00 Rogoff is class are being documented in the respective sections
31:05 . And also there is a search box , you
31:08 know , just like the simple Google surged . You
31:12 can search for questions and find relevant answers , and
31:17 it does it in a very smart way . It
31:19 is able to understand , for example , the same
31:23 question of the topic , even if it has asked
31:26 a little differently . It's able to find . So
31:29 if you could do me a favor , professor ,
31:31 maybe click on one of the questions so that they
31:33 can actually see how the answer reveals itself . So
31:39 that is , if you're browsing , you get to
31:41 , you know , see the answers . And of
31:43 course you can . You know , type in a
31:44 question . Let's put something that we learn today .
31:48 Like , what is Addie or something like that ?
32:05 So it fetches that information from the database that makes
32:09 it immediately available on duh . I want to draw
32:12 your attention to something that's very unique to this .
32:15 Um , so let's ask a question that is not
32:18 in the databases . So , for example , we
32:20 could ask a question like what ? Instructional models are
32:24 useful for Small district's You click search , so it's
32:41 self telling us that there is no no results were
32:43 found . But what is very interesting here is that
32:47 visitors off this page have the opportunity to request an
32:52 answer to this , and Professor Rogoff on a team
32:55 of volunteers are monitoring the incoming questions , so they're
32:58 gonna answer them wherever possible as quickly as possible .
33:03 And by the way , we are looking for in
33:06 a volunteer . So if some of you , after
33:08 your experiences , want to become part of the community
33:11 with love for you to engage with us on help
33:15 , answer questions because the intent here is to actually
33:19 put it in the hands off educators throughout the country
33:24 , you know , for example , you have colleagues
33:25 that are not in the class today , and they
33:28 could benefit from some of the topics that we have
33:30 been discussing and making it easily accessible to them through
33:35 this platform is one of the goals off this project
33:39 . And , uh , another interesting thing here is
33:42 that you can easily share and distribute this information .
33:46 It's an open source database off questions , everything around
33:51 distance learning . So there is also an embed code
33:56 that you can request on the page itself . It's
33:58 also in the power point that we're sharing with you
34:01 . So if your school bab site , uh ,
34:05 you know , administrator can add those few lines of
34:08 code , then essentially the budget that we are experiencing
34:11 here can be made available on any website of your
34:14 choice or a blogged . Um , the link is
34:20 in the chat in today's meeting , as well as
34:24 in the poor point . And so I would love
34:27 to answer any questions at a later time if there
34:30 are any professor back to you . Okay . Thank
34:34 you very much . So , yeah . Here's this
34:36 embed code that zone the slides . Um , yeah
34:43 . Anyway , super cool . Thank you very much
34:46 . Okay , so let's get back in curriculum and
34:48 instructional tools . Uh , this is somewhat of a
34:51 review of things we covered last week . I'm not
34:54 going to spend much time on it , but curriculum
34:56 solutions , this is for coordinators , teachers department leads
35:01 , and this helps you map the curriculum . It
35:06 sets up planning templates . Um , you know ,
35:10 helps you get organized and structured . Uh , then
35:13 there a digital learning platforms . So this is a
35:16 core functionality for teachers and students . This is the
35:21 lessons adaptive learning solutions . So that there assessing how
35:28 a student is doing finding what their weaknesses are and
35:32 helping them focus on those weaknesses to repair them .
35:35 They're assessing student performance individually and overall , they're tracking
35:40 progress . And , you know , this which I
35:42 personally think his key is toe , you know ,
35:44 differentiate instruction , you know , through adaptive learning .
35:49 So are we providing each individual student what he or
35:53 she needs ? What's most effective for them ? Digital
35:59 assessment solutions . Again , we mentioned this last week
36:04 . This is for everybody , including parents , administrators
36:09 and teachers . So customized tests . The tests get
36:14 delivered by a digital devices with security , um ,
36:18 tools built in such a rotating The questions , rotating
36:22 the answers , putting , uh , time requirements on
36:28 on it . They compile the the assessment and analytical
36:33 reports . Um , you know , and make it
36:36 easy . I mean , this part because they do
36:38 the grating . The grating is all done by the
36:41 system . It's , uh , you know , it
36:43 makes it a ZZ as possible for the teacher and
36:48 the and the administration . Eso You know , this
36:53 is something we pulled together , I think very useful
36:55 . I hope for you is , you know ,
36:57 what's the recommended student and teacher daily online workload .
37:02 So I'm sure many of you have been overwhelmed by
37:06 zoom meetings . Maybe , you know , including this
37:08 one . You know , there's just a limit to
37:10 how many hours a day you can spend staring at
37:14 your screen or engaging with people on Zoom . And
37:18 , of course , this is being studied . Now
37:20 will be very interesting to see what the studies show
37:24 . But anybody who has spent 68 or more hours
37:27 a day , um , in these in a zoom
37:30 in zoom meetings or other kinds of , uh ,
37:33 interactive things knows they come away with , you know
37:38 , what can I say ? No need for a
37:40 rest . I need for a drink . I need
37:42 for a , um you know , uh , Bubble
37:48 Bath ? I don't know . Something Thio sort of
37:51 take their head out of that . And so what
37:54 ? What is it ? So , you know ,
37:57 20 to 60 minutes a day for , you know
37:59 , young Children , Um , you know , even
38:03 , you know , 68th graders , um , you
38:07 know , 90 minutes , 180 minutes , you know
38:10 , 180 minutes , that's a three hours . That's
38:13 a lot . But , you know , they can
38:14 manage that . And , uh , and then very
38:20 important is that the material within this time period has
38:26 to be broken up into chunks people can't take ,
38:31 you know , the younger you are , Maybe the
38:34 older you are , you can't take , you know
38:38 , 40 minutes of hard driving teaching instruction . So
38:44 you need Thio . Really ? Set your goals .
38:47 Make them modest . Don't expect to achieve everything that
38:52 you would hope . Thio Do it in small chunks
38:55 . Um , here , even for older kids .
38:58 One subject area in a class . Um , you
39:03 know , so you know , it really argues and
39:06 we talked about this last week is that you need
39:09 to be an incrementalist . You need to be happy
39:13 to move the ball forward in small steps . Okay
39:18 . Suggested remote instruction framework . I think there's a
39:22 very useful chart . I know it's a lot of
39:25 words , you know , but use it . I'm
39:27 not gonna read it to you , but use it
39:29 after , um afterwards eso we can look at learning
39:35 experience dimensions in three ways . Expository , active or
39:41 interactive . Um , and is it synchronous or asynchronous
39:47 ? And then it gives us what the face to
39:50 face alternatives are and what the face to face learning
39:55 enhancements might be using technology . So if we wanna
40:01 have an interactive just go to the bottom row here
40:06 if we wanna have an interactive asynchronous learning experience ,
40:11 face to face professional development for science teachers through threaded
40:16 discussions . So these are you know highly interactive message
40:22 boards on topics . So there's , like , you
40:24 know , forums , discussion boards , Um , you
40:27 know , threaded discussions , uh , chat rooms ,
40:30 etcetera . And then we can enhance it with supplemental
40:36 threaded discussions for pre service teachers participating in face to
40:42 face course on science methods so we can begin to
40:47 weaken . Let them let these teachers experience this environment
40:54 in an asynchronous way . This makes their learning mawr
40:58 interactive . And when they go into the classroom there
41:02 mawr comfortable using these tools . I mean , I
41:06 think it's a big issue with teachers . If you
41:08 haven't used any of these tools , it's very hard
41:11 to teach others people to use them or to feel
41:13 comfortable . So anyway , I give you this this
41:16 chart use it as a reference . Um , use
41:19 it as a way to stimulate your own thinking about
41:21 how you can design a curriculum for your students and
41:26 even for your teachers . Um , that will achieve
41:30 your learning objectives . So suggestions for additional activities again
41:35 , this is a tool that we hope will be
41:38 useful for you . Thio Supplement on online learning environment
41:45 Hybrid one eyes to remember that all of these things
41:49 need to be paid attention to indeed nurtured . So
41:54 , you know , puzzles , word searches , writing
41:58 journals , keeping a diary , you know , drawing
42:02 a map of your neighborhood building with blocks and Legos
42:06 . You know , these all stimulate people in a
42:08 different way . Nurture them . Let them bring back
42:13 that experience into the online learning . Um , focus
42:17 on the on physical activity as well . Um ,
42:22 you know , studies show that people who exercise reasonably
42:27 rigorously yet an improvement in mood mawr than taking antidepressant
42:33 drugs . It's easy . It's cheap . It's fun
42:36 . Makes you feel better , keeps you healthier on
42:40 git . Works for everybody . So , you know
42:42 , for anybody who's in that environment of staring at
42:46 screens day and night , take a walk , take
42:48 a dance class and do a dance class virtually .
42:51 Um , you know , yoga , all of these
42:54 things , um , things to feed your spirit and
42:57 soul music , creative arts , meditation , etcetera .
43:04 The environment makes a big difference , you know ?
43:08 Are you working in a clean room ? Is a
43:10 quiet . Are you doing things ? They take care
43:15 of others . You know , taking care of pets
43:18 , taking care of your grandmother . Um , you
43:21 know , these are good environmental things that make people
43:25 more mentally healthy . and allow them to engage online
43:31 mawr completely . And of course , family . Um
43:35 , you know , can't get away from how important
43:38 this is on every on every measure . So interactive
43:43 , posit , interacting positively with your family . Extremely
43:48 important . And this is something that you can talk
43:51 to your teachers about . Your teachers can talk to
43:53 your students about . Okay . What does ah ,
43:56 distance learning lesson plan look like ? Well , you
44:01 know , here it is . You know , it
44:03 looks like , ah , battle plan . And I
44:05 guess it is a battle plan . So when it's
44:08 all said and done , you end up with a
44:12 detailed program of what you're going to do every day
44:16 . This is for an entirely online program . There's
44:20 no synchronous sessions in this map . Um , but
44:24 when it's all finished , the teachers , the students
44:28 , they all see what are they doing ? What's
44:31 required of them ? Where are they getting it on
44:35 bond ? Um , you know , you can't You
44:41 can't have a complex system like this without a without
44:45 a presentation of it in an organized , usable way
44:49 that you can you and your students and everybody can
44:52 refer to including , you know , obviously the parents
44:55 . Okay . Eso ideal instructional practices content . This
45:01 is a long list that goes over several slides giving
45:06 it to you as something that you can refer to
45:10 as an idea . Um , feeder to you .
45:15 Something that you can look at as you begin to
45:18 plan what you're doing . Toe , Look at this
45:21 list and say , Am I covering this issue ?
45:24 How might I cover it ? Have I thought about
45:27 this idea ? So is there mawr I need to
45:31 do so ? This is everything from having a deep
45:34 understanding of the varying learning styles of your students to
45:39 building in course components to reflect the interests of the
45:41 students to provide alternative options for students participating in a
45:47 virtual class . Are there ? Is there other ways
45:49 that they could do this ? Are you providing transcripts
45:54 or pre recorded audio or video used by students thes
46:00 air all like I would just call them an idea
46:02 dump of things that you could do . Are you
46:05 utilizing virtual museum tours ? You know , a lot
46:08 of museums have added these virtual tours . Why ?
46:11 While they're closed , Thio , Thio , physical visitors
46:17 and some of them are fantastic and they're engaging on
46:21 DVI video demonstrations . Eso anyway , you know very
46:26 , uh , you know , cool of science Museum
46:29 has added a lot of , you know , a
46:30 lot of stuff . And , of course , YouTube
46:32 only has , you know , 10 million options for
46:36 for you toe . Look at , um how do
46:39 you plan to include parents in the process ? Uh
46:42 huh . You considered just a technology the Are you
46:48 providing visibility to students online ? Work on and on
46:52 and on . Lots of , you know , options
46:55 for you to consider . How are you encouraging parents
47:00 to participate ? Mawr ? What are you asking them
47:03 to Dio ? I would say that one of the
47:07 themes of a number of things on this list is
47:11 that you're not just asking three parents to be judges
47:15 of what you're doing with their child . You're asking
47:19 them to be active participants by doing things such as
47:25 drawing or writing poems or playing games with their particular
47:32 games with their kids , doing puzzles with them so
47:35 that the conversation with parents that follows is not just
47:40 them , telling you all the things that you should
47:43 be doing , but you also asking them , Are
47:47 they participating in this process and how important that is
47:52 ? And this will not only help the student .
47:55 It will make the parent feel better , more active
47:58 . Warren have a better understanding of what issues They're
48:02 They're child is struggling with what areas the child is
48:05 excel ing in . Okay , so let's take a
48:08 look at the big picture here . Step away for
48:11 a minute . So we've got we're coming off here
48:14 . We're in the cove . It and the summer
48:16 slide . Um , you know , the multiplication table
48:21 is now a distant memory , so kid comes back
48:24 to school . Let's take a refresher test . Let's
48:28 measure where they are . Let's specify and identify what
48:33 that learning laws is . Let's offer them some remedial
48:37 practice . You know , Billy , you know ,
48:39 you seem to have for gotten seven tables . And
48:42 so , let's , you know , let me supply
48:44 you with some online learning tools . They focus on
48:49 the seven table . I'm just making this up because
48:51 I struggled with seven table and I still dio .
48:54 So the media practice now , when the child has
48:58 finished all this , they're ready for the new academic
49:01 year , and to go back to that , they're
49:03 ready to move up to the next step of learning
49:07 and let me just go back to this hold on
49:14 one second ISS Here we are . So now you
49:21 In essence , you identified where they slipped in the
49:25 foundational standards . You went back . You covered the
49:30 seven table of multiplication table again , and they're now
49:35 ready to move up to the next grade level .
49:39 And this is the most direct , simplified presentation off
49:45 this issue . S O . Okay , So a
49:51 few other overall guidelines were getting close to wrapping up
49:55 . Um , start from scratch . Don't just migrate
49:57 existing courses . Everything is changing . Um , the
50:02 tools air changing your understanding is changing your teachers Understanding
50:07 and comfort with technology and online tools is changing focus
50:12 on increasing student involvement . So key increased student involvement
50:17 through projects , teams , polls , presentations , exercises
50:20 . All of these other things outline in detail with
50:24 many small parts . So you end up with that
50:27 with that table of your plan that's got a lot
50:31 of detail to it . Maintain live faculty involvement .
50:35 So you can't just do this by saying we're moving
50:40 online and the teachers they're gonna review the grades .
50:43 Absolutely not . Not gonna work . So how can
50:47 you maximize live faculty involvement ? Well , you know
50:52 , least you could do is they can call the
50:54 student from time to time . Hopefully , you know
50:57 frequently they can have synchronous classes . Um , they
51:02 can comment on assignments in a real time basis .
51:06 So the mawr that the student feels that there's a
51:09 really life faculty person involved in their education , the
51:13 better it's gonna work . Don't expect to greater respond
51:16 to every student activity . So if you do a
51:19 good job of creating activities , hosts exercises , journals
51:25 , the teacher can't possibly great and respond to every
51:27 one of them . So , you know , pick
51:29 your spots . Include include videos for student assignments .
51:34 Eso the teacher can record a video we talked about
51:39 last week like Loom extremely easy tool to use to
51:43 integrate with the assignments . The teacher has a video
51:47 . Ah , little circle , whatever in the bottom
51:49 of the screen that says Hi everyone . You know
51:53 , this is Mr Smith . Here's the assignment for
51:55 this week and talk about it . Talk about how
51:59 they did last week takes very , very little time
52:02 . Very easy , very easy for the students to
52:04 use , and many options for how you could do
52:07 that , said the course goals specify the competencies .
52:11 So this is we talked about this to find the
52:14 assessment process , then work backwards . How are you
52:17 going to assess success towards reaching your goals ? And
52:22 then are the tools there to hit that those goals
52:27 and to manage that assessment process and to get an
52:31 A on the test to manage the the other test
52:33 is the assessment . Focus on what's measurable and here
52:37 I'm going to give you examples of words that lead
52:41 toe measurable outcomes and words that lead to non measurable
52:45 outcomes . So if you ask a student to explain
52:48 something to compare things that to solve a problem ,
52:51 these are measurable assignments , you can measure how well
52:56 they've explained it . You congratulate it . You congratulate
53:00 how well they compared things . And you congrats how
53:03 well they solve the problem . Other words that lead
53:06 to non measurable things , appreciate and learn . Did
53:10 you appreciate Beethoven's Fifth Symphony that we heard earlier today
53:14 ? Yes , I appreciated it . I don't know
53:16 . How do you know ? How do you grade
53:18 it ? Did you learn about how Beethoven use the
53:22 timpani in the orchestra ? Well , I don't know
53:25 . I don't know how you how you students says
53:28 they learn . I don't . You have to take
53:30 their word for it . if you ask them to
53:32 explain how Beethoven use the timpani in the Fifth Symphony
53:36 that you can grade building fun and engagement . This
53:40 is for everybody . Teachers . Everybody likes to have
53:42 more fun and engagement . Everybody learns better in that
53:45 environment . Outline the course in detail as we talked
53:50 about . Don't reinvent the wheel , build on existing
53:54 content . Don't replicate it , but build on it
53:57 from schools , publishers , previous courses . You've got
54:00 a lot of things . These , um , you
54:03 know , open libraries air fantastic and we provide some
54:06 links to those Your role is an administrator . Provide
54:10 the resource is offer the training , create the measurable
54:14 goals , give ongoing guidance and support and positive feedback
54:19 . We talked about that last week so important and
54:22 integrate into the administrative enrollment and grading systems . So
54:26 you need to whatever they dio needs to go back
54:30 into your school systems . Communication guidelines . You got
54:36 to respond quickly and frequently , um , talked about
54:42 , you know , students having life contact with the
54:46 teachers . Parent calls also held monthly house . Billy
54:51 doing what is the parent doing that ? The parent
54:54 ? Do the parent write a journal ? When Billy
54:56 wrote a journal , uh , you know , weekly
54:59 or monthly meetings . And then I see them just
55:02 about on time . You know , Please volunteer to
55:05 be a case study in the next session . Here's
55:08 my Here's my you can connect with May . You
55:11 can call me on Bond . Let's talk about ,
55:15 you know , going through some specific cases of putting
55:19 Aled these tools together . So many options , so
55:22 many issues . Let's talk about how we can solve
55:25 specific riel problems with them in an intelligent way .
55:30 So that's it . That's what I've got to say
55:34 . Um , thank you very much . I'm happy
55:43 to stay on the phone for questions and comments .
55:45 If people have it , I'll also take a look
55:47 at the chat . Uh , see what people had
55:50 to say . Let's see . Okay . Uh ,
56:06 okay . Aloha from copper . Who ? So that's
56:11 Hawaii ? Everybody jealous ? I see . Yeah ,
56:16 OK , All right . Well , thank you very
56:26 much . And there's a question about the power point
56:29 . If it would be available , the power point
56:33 will be available . Other resource is will be available
56:40 . So you all would have probably received a log
56:43 in and through your account you can access the poor
56:48 point as well as the recorded lecture and also there
56:52 is a mini quiz . Oh , so yeah ,
56:55 that's different . Available ? Yeah . So for those
56:59 of you who are using this , who would like
57:01 to get C P e credits or professional development credits
57:06 , you may be required to take a quiz .
57:08 So we provide that for you , and we're registering
57:12 the court the course for that . If you are
57:15 , um , professional association or state requires something else
57:20 , just ask us to help you with that .
57:23 Oh , all right . Okay . Cool . Thank
57:30 you . I appreciate it . I found it very
57:34 informative and helpful . Wonderful . So look forward to
57:37 seeing everybody next week . Thank you very much .
57:41 Sounds good . Thank you very much . Great .
57:44 Thank you . Thanks .
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