Treasure Island

- By Robert Louis Stevenson
Font Size
Robert Louis Stevenson (born Robert Lewis Balfour Stevenson; 13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894) was a Scottish novelist, poet and travel writer, most noted for writing Treasure Island, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Kidnapped, and A Child's Garden of Verses. Born and educated in Edinburgh, Stevenson suffered from serious bronchial trouble for much of his life, but continued to write prolifically and travel widely in defiance of his poor health. As a young man, he mixed in London literary circles, receiving encouragement from Andrew Lang, Edmund Gosse, Leslie Stephen and W. E. Henley, the last of whom may have provided the model for Long John Silver in Treasure Island. In 1890, he settled in Samoa where, alarmed at increasing European and American influence in the South Sea islands, his writing turned away from romance and adventure toward a darker realism. He died in his island home in 1894.[1]

Treasure Island

 
 
1. The next ten or twelve pages were filled with a curious series of entries. There was a date at one end of the line and at the other a sum of money, as in common account-books, but instead of explanatory writing, only a varying number of crosses between the two.
 
2. On the 12th of June, 1745, for instance, a sum of seventy pounds had plainly become due to someone, and there was nothing but six crosses to explain the cause. In a few cases, to be sure, the name of a place would be added, as “Offe Caraccas,” or a mere entry of latitude and longitude.
 
3. The record lasted over nearly twenty years, the amount of the separate entries growing larger as time went on, and at the end, a grand total had been made out after five or six wrong additions, and these words appended, “Bones, his pile.”
 
4. “I can’t make heads or tails of this,” said Dr. Livesey.
 
“The thing is as clear as noonday,” cried the squire. “This is the black-hearted hound’s account-book. These crosses stand for the names of ships or towns that they sank or plundered. The sums are the scoundrel’s share, and where he feared an ambiguity, you see he added something clearer. “Offe Caraccas,” now; you see, here was some unhappy vessel boarded off that coast. God help the poor souls that manned her—coral long ago.”
 
5. “Right!” said the doctor. “See what it is to be a traveler. Right! And the amounts increase, you see, as he rose in rank.”
 
6. There was little else in the volume but a few bearings of places noted in the blank leaves towards the end and a table for reducing French, English, and Spanish money to a common value.
 
“Thrifty, man!” cried the doctor.“He wasn’t the one to be cheated.”
 
7. “And now,” said the squire, “for the other.”
 
The paper had been sealed in several places with a thimble by way of a seal, the very thimble, perhaps, that I had found in the captain’s pocket. The doctor opened the seals with great care, and there fell out the map of an island, with latitude and longitude, soundings, names of hills and bays and inlets, and every particular that would be needed to bring a ship to a safe anchorage upon its shores. It was about nine miles long and five across, shaped, you might say, like a fat dragon standing up, and had two fine land-locked harbors, and a hill in the center part marked “The Spy- Glass.”
 
8. There were several additions of a later date, but above all, three crosses of red ink—two on the north part of the island, one in the southwest—and beside this last, in the same red ink, and in a small, neat hand, very different from the captain’s tottery characters, these words: “Bulk of treasure here.”
 
9. Over on the back, the same hand had written this further information:
Tall tree, Spy-glass shoulder, bearing a point to the N. of N.N.E. Skeleton Island E.S.E. and by E. Ten feet. The bar silver is in the north cache; you can find it by the trend of the east hummock, ten fathoms south of the black crag with the face on it. The arms are easily found, in the sand-hill, N. point of north inlet cape, bearing E. and a quarter N. J.F.
 
10. That was all, but brief as it was, and to me incomprehensible, it filled the squire and Dr. Livesey with delight.
 
“Livesey,” said the squire, “you will give up this wretched practice at once. Tomorrow I start for Bristol. In three weeks’ time—three weeks!—two weeks—ten days—we’ll have the best ship, sir, and the choicest crew in England. Hawkins shall come as cabin-boy. You’ll make a famous cabinboy, Hawkins. You, Livesey, are ship’s doctor; I am admiral. We’ll take Redruth, Joyce, and Hunter. We’ll have favorable winds, a quick passage, and not the least difficulty in finding the spot, and money to eat, to roll in, to play duck and drake with ever after.”
 
11. “Trelawney,” said the doctor, “I’ll go with you, and I’ll go bail for it, so will Jim, and be a credit to the undertaking. There’s only one man I’m afraid of.”
 
“And who’s that?” cried the squire. “Name the dog, sir!”
 
12. “You,” replied the doctor, “for you cannot hold your tongue. We are not the only men who know of this paper. These fellows who attacked the inn tonight—bold, desperate blades, for sure—and the rest who stayed aboard that lugger, and more, I dare say, not far off, are, one and all, through thick and thin, bound that they’ll get that money. We must none of us go alone till we get to the sea. Jim and I shall stick together in the meanwhile; you’ll take Joyce and Hunter when you ride to Bristol, and from first to last, not one of us must breathe a word of what we’ve found.”
 
13. “Livesey,” returned the squire, “you are always in the right of it. I’ll be as silent as the grave.”

Current Page: 1

GRADE:6

Questions and Answers

Please wait while we generate questions and answers...

Ratings & Comments

Write a Review
5 Star
0
0
4 Star
0
0
3 Star
0
0
2 Star
0
0
1 Star
0
0
0

0 Ratings & 0 Reviews

Word Lists:

Thimble : a metal or plastic cap with a closed end, worn to protect the finger and push the needle in sewing.

Hummock : a hillock, knoll, or mound.

Squire : a man of high social standing who owns and lives on an estate in a rural area, especially the chief landowner in such an area

Ambiguity : the quality of being open to more than one interpretation; inexactness

Cache : a collection of items of the same type stored in a hidden or inaccessible place

Explanatory : serving to explain something

Longitude : the angular distance of a place east or west of the meridian at Greenwich, England, or west of the standard meridian of a celestial object, usually expressed in degrees and minutes

Entry : an act of going or coming in

Crag : a steep or rugged cliff or rock face.

Latitude : the angular distance of a place north or south of the earth's equator, or of a celestial object north or south of the celestial equator, usually expressed in degrees and minutes

More...

Additional Information:

Rating: A

Words: 961

Unique Words : 408

Sentences : 81

Reading Time : 4:16

Noun : 380

Conjunction : 107

Adverb : 43

Interjection : 4

Adjective : 68

Pronoun : 60

Verb : 109

Preposition : 102

Letter Count : 4,016

Sentiment : Positive

Tone : Neutral (Slightly Formal)

Difficult Words : 191

EdSearch WebSearch