Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume II (of II) King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table

- By Thomas Malory
Font Size
Sir Thomas Malory (c. 1415 – 14 March 1471) was an English writer, the author or compiler of Le Morte d'Arthur, the classic English-language chronicle of the Arthurian legend, published by William Caxton in 1485. Malory's identity has never been confirmed, but the likeliest candidate is Sir Thomas Malory of Newbold Revel in Warwickshire. Much of his life history is obscure, but Caxton classifies him as a 'knight prisoner', apparently reflecting a criminal career, for which there is ample evidence, though he was also a prisoner-of-war during the Wars of the Roses, in which he supported both sides at different times. Most of what is known about Malory stems from the accounts describing him in the prayers found in the Winchester Manuscript of Le Morte d'Arthur. He is described as a "knyght presoner", distinguishing him from six other candidates also bearing the name Thomas Malory in the 15th century when Le Morte d'Arthur was written.[1]
THE queen heard thereof, and came after with many ladies, and shewed them the stone where it hoved on the water. Sir, said the king unto Sir Galahad, here is a great marvel as ever I saw, and right good knights have assayed and failed. Sir, said Galahad, that is no marvel, for this adventure is not theirs but mine; and for the surety of this sword I brought none with me, for here by my side hangeth the scabbard. And anon he laid his hand on the sword, and lightly drew it out of the stone, and put it in the sheath, and said unto the king: Now it goeth better than it did aforehand. Sir, said the king, a shield God shall send you. Now have I that sword that sometime was the good knight's, Balin le Savage, and he was a passing good man of his hands; and with this sword he slew his brother Balan, and that was great pity, for he was a good knight, and either slew other through a dolorous stroke that Balin gave unto my grandfather King Pelles, the which is not yet whole, nor not shall be till I heal him.
Therewith the king and all espied where came riding down the river a lady on a white palfrey toward them. Then she saluted the king and the queen, and asked if that Sir Launcelot was there. And then he answered himself: I am here, fair lady. Then she said all with weeping: How your great doing is changed sith this day in the morn. Damosel, why say you so? said Launcelot. I say you sooth, said the damosel, for ye were this day the best knight of the world, but who should say so now, he should be a liar, for there is now one better than ye, and well it is proved by the adventures of the sword whereto ye durst not set to your hand; and that is the change and leaving of your name. Wherefore I make unto you a remembrance, that ye shall not ween from henceforth that ye be the best knight of the world. As touching unto that, said Launcelot, I know well I was never the best. Yes, said the damosel, that were ye, and are yet, of any sinful man of the world. And, Sir king, Nacien, the hermit, sendeth thee word, that thee shall befall the greatest worship that ever befell king in Britain; and I say you wherefore, for this day the Sangreal appeared in thy house and fed thee and all thy fellowship of the Round Table. So she departed and went that same way that she came

Current Page: 1

GRADE:0

Questions and Answers

Please wait while we generate questions and answers...

Ratings & Comments

Write a Review
5 Star
0
0
4 Star
0
0
3 Star
0
0
2 Star
0
0
1 Star
0
0
0

0 Ratings & 0 Reviews

Word Lists:

Dolorous : feeling or expressing great sorrow or distress

Assay : the testing of a metal or ore to determine its ingredients and quality

Scabbard : a sheath for the blade of a sword or dagger, typically made of leather or metal

Slew : turn or slide violently or uncontrollably in a particular direction

Sheath : a cover for the blade of a knife or sword.

Befall : (of something bad) happen to someone

Knight : (in the Middle Ages) a man who served his sovereign or lord as a mounted soldier in armor.

Wherefore : for what reason

Anon : soon; shortly

Sinful : wicked and immoral; committing or characterized by the committing of sins

More...

Additional Information:

Rating: C

Words: 449

Unique Words : 197

Sentences : 18

Reading Time : 1:59

Noun : 96

Conjunction : 62

Adverb : 33

Interjection : 0

Adjective : 22

Pronoun : 56

Verb : 83

Preposition : 34

Letter Count : 1,772

Sentiment : Positive

Tone : Conversational

Difficult Words : 79

EdSearch WebSearch