Try our new chrome extension - Lumos Readability Assistant

Aesop's Fables

- By Aesop
Font Size
Aesop (/ˈiːsɒp/ EE-sop or /ˈeɪsɒp/ AY-sop; Greek: Αἴσωπος, Aísopos; c. 620–564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day. Many of the tales are characterized by animals and inanimate objects that speak, solve problems, and generally have human characteristics. Scattered details of Aesop's life can be found in ancient sources, including Aristotle, Herodotus, and Plutarch. An ancient literary work called The Aesop Romance tells an episodic, probably highly fictional version of his life, including the traditional description of him as a strikingly ugly slave (δοῦλος) who by his cleverness acquires freedom and becomes an adviser to kings and city-states. Older spellings of his name have included Esop(e) and Isope. Depictions of Aesop in popular culture over the last 2500 years have included many works of art and his appearance as a character in numerous books, films, plays, and television programs.
A Woodman was felling a tree on the bank of a river, when his axe, glancing off the trunk, flew out of his hands and fell into the water. As he stood by the water's edge lamenting his loss, Mercury appeared and asked him the reason for his grief; and on learning what had happened, out of pity for his distress he dived into the river and, bringing up a golden axe, asked him if that was the one he had lost. The Woodman replied that it was not, and Mercury then dived a second time, and, bringing up a silver axe, asked if that was his. "No, that is not mine either," said the Woodman. Once more Mercury dived into the river, and brought up the missing axe. The Woodman was overjoyed at recovering his property, and thanked his benefactor warmly; and the latter was so pleased with his honesty that he made him a present of the other two axes. When the Woodman told the story to his companions, one of these was filled with envy of his good fortune and determined to try his luck for himself. So he went and began to fell a tree at the edge of the river, and presently contrived to let his axe drop into the water. Mercury appeared as before, and, on learning that his axe had fallen in, he dived and brought up a golden axe, as he had done on the previous occasion. Without waiting to be asked whether it was his or not the fellow cried, "That's mine, that's mine," and stretched out his hand eagerly for the prize: but Mercury was so disgusted at his dishonesty that he not only declined to give him the golden axe, but also refused to recover for him the one he had let fall into the stream.

Current Page: 1

GRADE:0

Ratings & Comments

Rate this Passage?
0

0 Ratings & 0 Reviews

5
0
0
4
0
0
3
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
Questions and Answers Aesop's Fables

Please wait while we generate questions and answers...

Word Lists:

Dive : plunge head first into water

Benefactor : a person who gives money or other help to a person or cause

Honesty : the quality of being honest

Contrived : deliberately created rather than arising naturally or spontaneously.

Warmly : in a way that gives out warmth; with comfortable heat

Disgust : a feeling of revulsion or strong disapproval aroused by something unpleasant or offensive

Edge : the outside limit of an object, area, or surface; a place or part farthest away from the center of something

Mine : used to refer to a thing or things belonging to or associated with the speaker

More...

Additional Information:

Words: 309

Unique Words : 134

Sentences : 10

Reading Time : 1:22

Noun : 63

Conjunction : 44

Adverb : 19

Interjection : 0

Adjective : 9

Pronoun : 34

Verb : 62

Preposition : 35

Letter Count : 1,240

Sentiment : Positive

Tone : Neutral (Slightly Conversational)

Difficult Words : 51

EdSearch WebSearch