THE ECCHOING GREEN

- By William Blake
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William Blake (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. What he called his prophetic works were said by 20th-century critic Northrop Frye to form "what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language".[2] His visual artistry led 21st-century critic Jonathan Jones to proclaim him "far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced".[3] In 2002, Blake was placed at number 38 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.[4] While he lived in London his entire life, except for three years spent in Felpham,[5] he produced a diverse and symbolically rich œuvre, which embraced the imagination as "the body of God"[6] or "human existence itself".[7] Although Blake was considered mad by contemporaries for his idiosyncratic views, he is held in high regard by later critics for his expressiveness and creativity, and for the philosophical and mystical undercurrents within his work. His paintings and poetry have been characterised as part of the Romantic movement and as "Pre-Romantic".[8] A committed Christian who was hostile to the Church of England (indeed, to almost all forms of organised religion), Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of the French and American revolutions.[9][10] Though later he rejected many of these political beliefs, he maintained an amiable relationship with the political activist Thomas Paine; he was also influenced by thinkers such as Emanuel Swedenborg.[11] Despite these known influences, the singularity of Blake's work makes him difficult to classify. The 19th-century scholar William Michael Rossetti characterised him as a "glorious luminary",[12] and "a man not forestalled by predecessors, nor to be classed with contemporaries, nor to be replaced by known or readily surmisable successors".[13]
The sun does arise,
And make happy the skies.
The merry bells ring
To welcome the Spring.
The sky-lark and thrush,
The birds of the bush,
Sing louder around,
To the bells' cheerful sound.
While our sports shall be seen
On the Ecchoing Green
. Old John, with white hair
Does laugh away care,
Sitting under the oak,
Among the old folk,
They laugh at our play,
And soon they all say.
'Such, such were the joys.
When we all girls & boys,
In our youth-time were seen,
On the Ecchoing Green.'
Till the little ones weary
No more can be merry
The sun does descend,
And our sports have an end:
Round the laps of their mothers,
Many sisters and brother zs,
Like birds in their nest,
Are ready for rest;
And sport no more seen,
On the darkening Green.

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Word Lists:

Merry : cheerful and lively

Lap : the flat area between the waist and knees of a seated person

Weary : feeling or showing tiredness, especially as a result of excessive exertion or lack of sleep

Descend : move or fall downward

Arise : (of a problem, opportunity, or situation) emerge; become apparent

Sound : vibrations that travel through the air or another medium and can be heard when they reach a person's or animal's ear

Till : up to (the point in time or the event mentioned); until

Merry : cheerful and lively

Lap : the flat area between the waist and knees of a seated person

Weary : feeling or showing tiredness, especially as a result of excessive exertion or lack of sleep

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Additional Information:

Rating: B

Words: 141

Unique Words : 89

Sentences : 8

Reading Time : 0:37

Noun : 39

Conjunction : 10

Adverb : 7

Interjection : 0

Adjective : 15

Pronoun : 9

Verb : 24

Preposition : 14

Letter Count : 569

Sentiment : Positive

Tone : Neutral (Slightly Formal)

Difficult Words : 19

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