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EXCERPT FROM BLACK BEAUTY: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A HORSE

- By Anna Sewell
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Anna Sewell (/ˈsuːəl/; 30 March 1820 – 25 April 1878)[1] was an English novelist. She is well known as the author of the 1877 novel Black Beauty, which is now considered one of the top ten best selling novels for children, although it was intended at the time for an adult audience.[2] Sewell was born on 30 March 1820 in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, into a devout Quaker family.[3] Her father was Isaac Phillip Sewell (1793–1879), and her mother, Mary Wright Sewell (1798–1884), was a successful author of children's books. She had one sibling, a younger brother named Philip. The children were largely educated at home by their mother due to a lack of money for schooling.[4]

EXCERPT FROM BLACK BEAUTY: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A HORSE

"Black horse training" by Pedro Ribeiro Simões is licensed under CC by 2.0

Every one may not know what breaking in is, therefore I will describe it. It means to teach a horse to wear a saddle and bridle, and to carry on his back a man, woman or child; to go just the way they wish, and to go quietly. Besides this he has to learn to wear a collar, a crupper, and a breeching, and to stand still while they are put on; then to have a cart or chaise fixed behind, so that he cannot walk or trot without dragging it after him; and he must go fast or slow, just as his driver wishes. He must never start at what he sees, nor speak to other horses, not bite, nor kick, nor have any will of his own, but always do his master's will, even though he may be very tired or hungry; but the worst of all is, when his harness is once on, he may neither jump for joy nor lie down for weariness. So you see this breaking in is a great thing.

I had of course been used to a halter and a headstall, and to be led about in the fields and lanes quietly, but now I was to have a bit and bridle; my master gave me some oats as usual, and after a good deal of coaxing he got the bit into my mouth, and the bridle fixed, but it was a nasty thing! Those who have never had a bit in their mouths cannot think how bad it feels; a great piece of cold hard steel as thick as a man's finger to be pushed into one's mouth, between one's teeth, and over one's tongue, with the ends coming out at the corner of your mouth, and held fast there by straps over your head, under your throat, round your nose, and under your chin; so that no way in the world can you get rid of the nasty hard thing; it is very bad! Yes, very bad! At least I thought so; but I knew my mother always wore one when she went out, and all horses did when they were grown up; and so, what with the nice oats, and what with my master's pats, kind words, and gentle ways, I got to wear my bit and bridle.

Next came the saddle, but that was not half so bad; my master put it on my back very gently, while old Daniel held my head; he then made the girths fast under my body, patting and talking to me all the time; then I had a few oats, then a little leading about; and this he did every day till I began to look for the oats and the saddle. At length, one morning, my master got on my back and rode me round the meadow on the soft grass. It certainly did feel queer; but I must say I felt rather proud to carry my master, and as he continued to ride me a little every day I soon became accustomed to it.

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Questions and Answers EXCERPT FROM BLACK BEAUTY: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A HORSE

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Additional Information:

Words: 1090

Unique Words : 233

Sentences : 12

Reading Time : 2:18

Noun : 106

Conjunction : 67

Adverb : 43

Interjection : 1

Adjective : 40

Pronoun : 66

Verb : 86

Preposition : 61

Letter Count : 1,878

Sentiment : Positive

Tone : Conversational

Difficult Words : 56

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