THE WHITE MAN'S BURDEN

- By Rudyard Kipling
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Joseph Rudyard Kipling (/ˈrʌdjərd/ RUD-yərd; 30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936)[1] was an English journalist, short-story writer, poet, and novelist. He was born in India, which inspired much of his work. Kipling's works of fiction include The Jungle Book (1894), Kim (1901), and many short stories, including "The Man Who Would Be King" (1888).[2] His poems include "Mandalay" (1890), "Gunga Din" (1890), "The Gods of the Copybook Headings" (1919), "The White Man's Burden" (1899), and "If—" (1910). He is seen as an innovator in the art of the short story.[3] His children's books are classics; one critic noted "a versatile and luminous narrative gift." [4][5]

THE WHITE MAN'S BURDEN

"The White Man's Burden" by Dan Meliton is licensed under CC by-NC-SA 2.0.

Take up the White Man's burden-
Send forth the best ye breed-
Go, bind your sons to exile
To serve your captives' need;
To wait, in heavy harness
On fluttered folk and wild-
Your new-caught, sullen peoples,
Half devil and half child.

Take up the White Man's burden-
In patience to abide,
To veil the threat of terror
And check the show of pride;
By open speech and simple,
An hundred times made plain,
To seek another's profit
And work another's gain.

Take up the White Man's burden-
The savage wars of peace-
Fill full the mouth of Famine,
And bid the sickness cease;
And when your goal is nearest
(The end for others sought)
Watch sloth and heathen folly
Bring all your hope to nought.

Take up the White Man's burden-
No iron rule of kings,
But toil of serf and sweeper-
The tale of common things.
The ports ye shall not enter,
The roads ye shall not tread,
Go, make them with your living
And mark them with your dead.

Take up the White Man's burden,
And reap his old reward-
The blame of those ye better
The hate of those ye guard-
The cry of hosts ye humour
(Ah, slowly!) to the light:
"Why brought ye us from bondage,
Our loved Egyptian night?"

Take up the White Man's burden-
Ye dare not stoop to less-
Nor call too loud on Freedom
To cloak your weariness.
By all ye will or whisper,
By all ye leave or do,
The silent sullen peoples
Shall weigh your God and you.

Take up the White Man's burden!
Have done with childish days-
The lightly-proffered laurel,
The easy, ungrudged praise:
Comes now, to search your manhood
Through all the thankless years,
Cold, edged with dear-bought wisdom,
The judgment of your peers!

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Word Lists:

Burden : a load, typically a heavy one.

Sloth : reluctance to work or make an effort; laziness

Sullen : bad-tempered and sulky; gloomy

Laurel : any of a number of shrubs and other plants with dark green glossy leaves.

Bondage : the state of being a slave

Weariness : extreme tiredness; fatigue

Reap : cut or gather (a crop or harvest)

Abide : accept or act in accordance with (a rule, decision, or recommendation)

Exile : the state of being barred from one's native country, typically for political or punitive reasons

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Additional Information:

Words: 308

Unique Words : 177

Sentences : 11

Reading Time : 1:22

Noun : 127

Conjunction : 18

Adverb : 17

Interjection : 0

Adjective : 31

Pronoun : 25

Verb : 34

Preposition : 37

Letter Count : 1,251

Sentiment : Positive

Tone : Neutral

Difficult Words : 82

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