NO MAN IS AN ISLAND

- By John Donne
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John Donne (/dʌn/ DUN; 22 January 1572[1] – 31 March 1631) was an English poet, scholar, soldier and secretary born into a recusant family, who later became a cleric in the Church of England.[3] Under royal patronage, he was made Dean of St Paul's Cathedral in London (1621–1631).[2] He is considered the preeminent representative of the metaphysical poets. His poetical works are noted for their metaphorical and sensual style and include sonnets, love poems, religious poems, Latin translations, epigrams, elegies, songs, and satires. He is also known for his sermons. Donne's style is characterised by abrupt openings and various paradoxes, ironies and dislocations. These features, along with his frequent dramatic or everyday speech rhythms, his tense syntax and his tough eloquence, were both a reaction against the smoothness of conventional Elizabethan poetry and an adaptation into English of European baroque and mannerist techniques.[4] His early career was marked by poetry that bore immense knowledge of English society and he met that knowledge with sharp criticism[citation needed]. Another important theme in Donne's poetry is the idea of true religion, something that he spent much time considering and about which he often theorised. He wrote secular poems as well as erotic and love poems. He is particularly famous for his mastery of metaphysical conceits.

NO MAN IS AN ISLAND

"Untitled" by Neven Krcmarek is licensed under CC0.

MODERN VERSION

No man is an island entire of itself; every man
is a piece of the continent, a part of the main;
if a clod be washed away by the sea, Europe
is the less, as well as if a promontory were, as
well as any manner of thy friends or of thine
own were; any man's death diminishes me,
because I am involved in mankind.
And therefore never send to know for whom
the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.

EARLY MODERN ENGLISH VERSION

No man is an Iland, intire of itselfe; every man
is a peece of the Continent, a part of the maine;
if a Clod bee washed away by the Sea, Europe
is the lesse, as well as if a Promontorie were, as
well as if a Manor of thy friends or of thine
owne were; any mans death diminishes me,
because I am involved in Mankinde;
And therefore never send to know for whom
the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.

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Additional Information:

Words: 167

Unique Words : 73

Sentences : 3

Reading Time : 0:44

Noun : 46

Conjunction : 23

Adverb : 12

Interjection : 0

Adjective : 6

Pronoun : 15

Verb : 22

Preposition : 16

Letter Count : 635

Sentiment : Positive

Tone : Neutral

Difficult Words : 35

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