What Are Fossils

- By Bonnie McRae
Font Size

What Are Fossils

right:0in; margin-bottom:15.15pt; margin-left:.5in; margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt 0.5in">Fossils are the remains of plants and animals.  Over time, these remains harden and become fossils.  It takes a long time for this process to be complete.  Many fossils are from plants and animals that lived thousands of years ago.
right:0in; margin-bottom:15.15pt; margin-left:.5in; margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt 0.5in">                   Fossils are created by nature.  People do not have to do anything for fossils to be appear.  The dead plants and animals that stay on top of the ground become fossils more quickly than those dead items that get buried.  This is because they are protected from things that would break them down.   When these parts are buried, ice, sediments, and other natural elements do not break these items down.  This is why paleontologists can unearth huge bones that belonged to dinosaurs.
right:0in; margin-bottom:15.15pt; margin-left:.5in; margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt 0.5in">                   There are some places across the United States that have a lot of great fossil finds.  One place is located in Elmo, Utah.  At the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, there are a lot of skeletons.  Allosaurs skeletons have been found here.  It is actually the place where the biggest collection of Jurassic bonds were ever found.  Farther south in Glen Rose, Texas, the Dinosaur Valley State Park has gotten attention from around the country and the globe.  There are actual dinosaur tracks that are huge and spectacular to see.  
right:0in; margin-bottom:15.15pt; margin-left:.5in; margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt 0.5in">                   While many people love to search for dinosaur fossils, there are other fossils to be found too.  In Arizona, there is the Petrified Forest National Park.  Here dino lovers may find dinosaur bones or eggs, but there is also a lot of fossilized wood.  That’s right – over time, wood becomes fossils too.  While mammoths lived much more recently than dinosaurs, their fossils can be found in Mammoth Site at Hot Springs in South Dakota.  This is actually a former sinkhole that is known to contain a huge number of mammoth skeletons.
right:0in; margin-bottom:15.15pt; margin-left:.5in; margin:0in 0in 0.0001pt 0.5in">                   Ultimately, fossils tell a story – a story about the Earth and its many living things.  The changes that occur around the world can be pieced together one fossil at a time to better understand past generations and the animals and plants present during these time periods.

Current Page: 1

GRADE:3

Ratings & Comments

Rate this Passage?
0

0 Ratings & 0 Reviews

5
0
0
4
0
0
3
0
0
2
0
0
1
0
0
Questions and Answers What Are Fossils

Please wait while we generate questions and answers...

Word Lists:

Dinosaur : a fossil reptile of the Mesozoic era, in many species reaching an enormous size.

Fossil : the remains or impression of a prehistoric organism preserved in petrified form or as a mold or cast in rock

Fossilize : preserve (an organism) so that it becomes a fossil

Paleontologist : a person who studies or is an expert in the branch of science concerned with fossil animals and plants.

Mammoth : a large extinct elephant of the Pleistocene epoch, typically hairy with a sloping back and long curved tusks.

Skeleton : an internal or external framework of bone, cartilage, or other rigid material supporting or containing the body of an animal or plant

Unearth : find (something) in the ground by digging.

Sediment : matter that settles to the bottom of a liquid; dregs

Spectacular : beautiful in a dramatic and eye-catching way

Item : an individual article or unit, especially one that is part of a list, collection, or set

More...

Additional Information:

Rating: B

Words: 444

Unique Words : 184

Sentences : 26

Reading Time : 1:58

Noun : 206

Conjunction : 30

Adverb : 32

Interjection : 1

Adjective : 22

Pronoun : 6

Verb : 70

Preposition : 33

Letter Count : 2,003

Sentiment : Positive

Tone : Neutral (Slightly Formal)

Difficult Words : 72

EdSearch WebSearch