Multiply with 5 and 10 Videos - Free Educational Videos for Students in K - 12


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This page provides a list of educational videos related to Multiply with 5 and 10. You can also use this page to find sample questions, apps, worksheets, lessons , infographics and presentations related to Multiply with 5 and 10.


Multiplying by 10


By Skubes ed

Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10–90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

      [5.NBT.2-2.0] Multiplying/Dividing by 10 - Common Core Standard


      By Front Row

      Discover more Common Core Math at https://www.frontrowed.com Explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied by a power of 10, use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10 Front Row is a free, adaptive, Common Core aligned math program for teachers and students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Front Row allows students to practice math at their own pace - learning advanced concepts when they're ready and receiving remediation when they struggle. Front Row provides teachers with access to a detailed data dashboard and weekly email reports that show which standards are causing students difficulty, what small groups can be formed for interventions, and how their students are progressing in math.Discover more Common Core Math at https://www.frontrowed.com

          [5.NBT.2-3.0] Multiplying/Dividing by 10 - Common Core Standard


          By Front Row

          Discover more Common Core Math at https://www.frontrowed.comExplain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is divided by a power of 10, use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10Front Row is a free, adaptive, Common Core aligned math program for teachers and students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Front Row allows students to practice math at their own pace - learning advanced concepts when they're ready and receiving remediation when they struggle. Front Row provides teachers with access to a detailed data dashboard and weekly email reports that show which standards are causing students difficulty, what small groups can be formed for interventions, and how their students are progressing in math.Discover more Common Core Math at https://www.frontrowed.com

              Multiplying Single Digit Numbers by Powers of 10


              By StoneBridgeMath

              This video demonstrates what it means to multiply a single digit number by a power of ten. For example 4 x 10 5 x 100 or 3 x 1000. This video can be used to build understanding of place value and would be a good precursor to expanded notation.

                  [5.NBT.2-1.0] Multiplying/Dividing by 10 - Common Core Standard - Practice Problem


                  By Front Row

                  Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10, use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10

                      Grade 5 Math - Multiply Decimals 1


                      By Lumos Learning

                      Using the Lumos Study Programs, parents and educators can reinforce the classroom learning experience for children and help them succeed at school and on the standardized tests. Lumos books, dvd, eLearning and tutoring are used by leading schools, libraries and thousands of parents to supplement classroom learning and improve student achievement in the standardized tests.

                      PARENTS please visit LumosTestPrep.com to learn more.
                      EDUCATORS please visit LumosLearning.com to learn more

                          [3.NBT.3-1.0] Intro multiplication - Common Core Standard


                          By Freckle by Renaissance

                          Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10–90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations. Front Row is a free, adaptive, Common Core aligned math program for teachers and students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Front Row allows students to practice math at their own pace - learning advanced concepts when they're ready and receiving remediation when they struggle. Front Row provides teachers with access to a detailed data dashboard and weekly email reports that show which standards are causing students difficulty, what small groups can be formed for interventions, and how their students are progressing in math.

                              [3.OA.5-1.0] Multiplication Properties - Common Core Standard


                              By Front Row

                              Discover more Common Core Math at https://www.frontrowed.comApply properties of operations as strategies to multiply.2 Examples: If 6 × 4 = 24 is known, then 4 × 6 = 24 is also known. (Commutative property of multiplication.) 3 × 5 × 2 can be found by 3 × 5 = 15, then 15 × 2 = 30, or by 5 × 2 = 10, then 3 × 10 = 30. (Associative property of multiplication.) Knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and 8 × 2 = 16, one can find 8 × 7 as 8 × (5 2) = (8 × 5) (8 × 2) = 40 16 = 56. (Distributive property.)Front Row is a free, adaptive, Common Core aligned math program for teachers and students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Front Row allows students to practice math at their own pace - learning advanced concepts when they 're ready and receiving remediation when they struggle. Front Row provides teachers with access to a detailed data dashboard and weekly email reports that show which standards are causing students difficulty, what small groups can be formed for interventions, and how their students are progressing in math.Discover more Common Core Math at https://www.frontrowed.com

                                  Polynomial Long Division | MathHelp.com


                                  By MathHelp.com

                                  McCauley can paint a house in 10 hours, while it takes Clayton 15 hours. If they work together, how long will it take them to paint the house? To solve this kind of a problem, which is called a work problem, it’s important to understand the following idea. Since McCauley can paint a house in 10 hours, we know that in 1 hour, McCauley can paint 1/10 of the house. And in 2 hours, McCauley can paint 2/10 of the house. Therefore, in t hours, McCauley can paint t tenths of the house. And since it takes Clayton 15 hours to paint the house, in t hours, Clayton can paint t fifteenths of the house. Pause the audio for a moment if you need time to understand this idea…Now, to solve the problem, we use the following formula: part of job done by McCauley + part of job done by Clayton = 1 job done. And we’re asked how long will it take them to paint the house, so we’re looking for the time, or t. Remember that in t hours, McCauley can paint t/10 of the house, so the part of the job done by McCauley is t over 10. And in t hours, Clayton can paint t/15 of the house, so the part of the job done by Clayton is t over 15. Now, we have the equation t/10 + t/15 = 1. To solve this equation for t, we first get rid of the fractions by multiplying both sides of the equation by the common denominator of 10 and 15, which is 30. Distributing on the left side, 30 times t over 10 is 30t over 10, which simplifies to 3t, and 30 times positive t over 15 is positive 30t over 15, which simplifies to positive 2t. And on the right, 1 times 30 is 30. So we have 3t + 2t = 30, or 5t = 30, and dividing both sides by 5, t = 6. So if Clayton and McCauley work together, they can paint the house in 6 hours. Finally, it’s a good idea to check your answer. If they work together for 6 hours, then McCauley paints 6/10 of the house, and Clayton paints 6/15 of the house, so we have 6/10 + 6/15 = 1. And reducing on the left side, we have 3/5 + 2/5 = 1, which simplifies to 5/5 = 1, which is a true statement, so our answer checks

                                      Grade 5 Math - Multiplaction and Division of Powers of Ten 2


                                      By Lumos Learning

                                      Using the Lumos Study Programs, parents and educators can reinforce the classroom learning experience for children and help them succeed at school and on the standardized tests. Lumos books, dvd, eLearning and tutoring are used by leading schools, libraries and thousands of parents to supplement classroom learning and improve student achievement in the standardized tests.

                                      PARENTS please visit LumosTestPrep.com to learn more.
                                      EDUCATORS please visit LumosLearning.com to learn more

                                          Grade 5 Math - Multiplaction and Division of Powers of Ten 1


                                          By Lumos Learning

                                          Using the Lumos Study Programs, parents and educators can reinforce the classroom learning experience for children and help them succeed at school and on the standardized tests. Lumos books, dvd, eLearning and tutoring are used by leading schools, libraries and thousands of parents to supplement classroom learning and improve student achievement in the standardized tests.

                                          PARENTS please visit LumosTestPrep.com to learn more.
                                          EDUCATORS please visit LumosLearning.com to learn more

                                              Grade 5 Math - Multiplaction and Division of Powers of Ten 4


                                              By Lumos Learning

                                              Using the Lumos Study Programs, parents and educators can reinforce the classroom learning experience for children and help them succeed at school and on the standardized tests. Lumos books, dvd, eLearning and tutoring are used by leading schools, libraries and thousands of parents to supplement classroom learning and improve student achievement in the standardized tests.

                                              PARENTS please visit LumosTestPrep.com to learn more.
                                              EDUCATORS please visit LumosLearning.com to learn more

                                                  Synthetic Division | MathHelp.com


                                                  By MathHelp.com

                                                  In this example, it’s tempting to divide x squared + 5x – 6 by x + 1 by first factoring x squared + 5x – 6. The factors of -6 that add to positive 5 are +6 and -1, so we have x + 6 times x – 1 over x + 1. Notice, however, that nothing cancels. In this situation, we need a different method of dividing the polynomials, so we use long division. In other words, we rewrite x squared + 5x – 6 divided by x + 1 as x + 1 divided into x squared + 5x – 6. Now, our first step in the long division is to determine how many times x goes into x squared. Since x goes into x squared x times, we write an x above the x squared, just like we do with regular long division. Next, we multiply the x times the x + 1 in the divisor to get x squared + x, and we write the x squared + x underneath the x squared + 5x. Next, we subtract x squared + x from x squared + 5x. And watch out for this step: it’s an area where most of the common mistakes in these types of problems are made. Instead of subtracting, I would change the sign of each term in x squared + x, so we have negative x squared + negative x, then add the columns. So we have x squared + negative x squared, which cancels out, and positive 5x + negative x, which is positive 4x. Next, we bring down the -6, in regular long division. Now, we need to determine how many times x goes into 4x. Since x goes into 4x 4 times, we write a positive 4 in our answer. Next, we multiply positive 4 times x + 1 to get 4x + 4, and we write the 4x + 4 underneath the 4x – 6. Next, we subtract 4x + 4 from 4x – 6. In other words, we change the signs on 4x + 4 to -4x + -4, and we add. 4x + -4x cancels out, and -6 + -4 is -10. And since there are no other numbers to bring down, we have a remainder of -10. Finally, remember from the previous example that we add the remainder over the divisor to the quotient. In other words, we add -10 over x + 1 to x + 4, and we have x + 4 + -10 over x + 1. So x squared + 5x – 6 divided by x + 1 simplifies to x + 4 + -10 over x + 1.

                                                      Division using place value understanding


                                                      By Khan Academy

                                                      Make division problems easier by thinking about place value and using the distributive property.

                                                          Product Rule | Adding Exponents | MathHelp.com


                                                          By MathHelp.com

                                                          This lesson covers multiplying integers. Students learn to multiply integers using the following rules. A positive times a positive equals a positive. For example, +3 x +5 = +15. A positive times a negative equals a negative. For example, +3 x -5 = -15. A negative times a positive equals a negative. For example, -3 x +5 = -15. And a negative times a negative equals a positive. For example, -3 x -5 = +15. In other words, if the signs are the same, the product is positive, and if the signs are different, the product is negative.

                                                              Grade 5 Math - Multiplaction and Division of Powers of Ten 3


                                                              By Lumos Learning

                                                              Using the Lumos Study Programs, parents and educators can reinforce the classroom learning experience for children and help them succeed at school and on the standardized tests. Lumos books, dvd, eLearning and tutoring are used by leading schools, libraries and thousands of parents to supplement classroom learning and improve student achievement in the standardized tests.

                                                              PARENTS please visit LumosTestPrep.com to learn more.
                                                              EDUCATORS please visit LumosLearning.com to learn more

                                                                  Complex Numbers In Polar Form De Moivre's Theorem, Products, Quotients, Powers, and nth Roots Prec


                                                                  By The Organic Chemistry Tutor

                                                                  This precalculus video tutorial focuses on complex numbers in polar form and de moivre's theorem. It explains how to find the products, quotients, powers and nth roots of complex numbers in polar form as well as converting it to and from rectangular form. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems and is useful for high school and college students taking precalculus or trigonometry. Here is a list of topics: 1. Graphing / Plotting Complex Numbers in a Complex Plane 2. Real Axis vs Imaginary Axis 3. How To Find The Absolute Value of a Complex Number 4. Complex Numbers - Rectangular Form to Polar Form 5. Converting Complex Numbers in Polar Form To Rectangular Form 6. Complex Numbers - List of Equations and Formulas 7. Finding R and Angle Theta From a and b 8. Writing Complex Numbers In Rectangular Form 9. Product of Two Complex Numbers In Polar Form Equation 10. Quotient of Two Complex Numbers In Polar Form Formula 11. Finding Products of Complex Numbers in Polar Form 12. Finding Quotients of Complex Numbers in Polar Form 13. Powers of Complex Numbers in Polar Form 14. De Moivre's Theorem - Roots of Complex Numbers in Polar Form 15. Solving Equations With Complex Numbers 16. Adding Complex Numbers in Polar Form 17. Multiplying Complex Numbers in Polar Form 18. Dividing Complex Numbers in Polar Form

                                                                      3rd Grade Math Rap


                                                                      By McCarthy Math Academy

                                                                      With a little help from the group, Mindless Behavior, I have created a math video with lyrics to help my students to understand and apply core math skills for third grade. People of all ages can jam out to this one. Enjoy!

                                                                      I've got a case of the operation blues.
                                                                      Because I don't know which one I should use.
                                                                      Look at the word problem for the clues.
                                                                      The key words tell you how to choose.

                                                                      Each means you multiply or you must divide.
                                                                      Tryna find the total? Then you multiply
                                                                      Total's in the problem? Then you must divide.
                                                                      Not quick to solve it, draw it, get it right.

                                                                      Addition's easy for me and you
                                                                      Sum, In all, together, and total too.
                                                                      When do you subtract? How many more?
                                                                      Fewer? Left? Less? Difference in a score?

                                                                      Place value's next. Disco on the " dess "
                                                                      Ones, tens, hundreds, to the left
                                                                      Thousands, Ten thousands, hundred...thousand
                                                                      Say the name of the place, yeah.

                                                                      The value's the amount of the place
                                                                      For example, 2,060.
                                                                      The value of the 2 is 2-0-0-0,
                                                                      The value of the 6 is 6-0.

                                                                      When you round, find and underline the place
                                                                      Spotlight to the right, decide the digit's fate
                                                                      5 or more, add 1 to the rounding place
                                                                      4 or less, do nothing but walk away, (estimate)

                                                                      A pen, penny is one, one cent
                                                                      A Nic-kel is five, a dime is ten cents
                                                                      25 for a quarter, George Washington
                                                                      100 cents makes a dollar, there he goes again.

                                                                      For pictographs, you gotta check out the key
                                                                      One smiley face might really equal three
                                                                      For bar graphs, pay attention to the scale
                                                                      Think it's counting by ones, huh, you'll fail

                                                                      Fractions are easy, just draw your best.
                                                                      Here they go from least to greatest
                                                                      1/12, 1/6, ¼, 1/3,
                                                                      ½, 2/3, ¾, Fraction nerd!

                                                                      You see that number on top,
                                                                      That's called the numerator
                                                                      It describes the amount
                                                                      That is being considered
                                                                      And if you jump down from the fraction bar
                                                                      Denominator
                                                                      It's the total number of equal parts.

                                                                      Let me give you an example:
                                                                      Leslie Moin has some coins
                                                                      A total of 9
                                                                      2 happen to be pennies
                                                                      While 7 are dimes.
                                                                      What's the fraction of dimes?
                                                                      How many coins? 9
                                                                      How many dimes? 7
                                                                      Say the fraction -- seven ninths

                                                                      Length times width is Area
                                                                      Distance around is Perimeter
                                                                      Break down the GEOMETRY

                                                                      3 sides makes triangle
                                                                      4 sides = quadrilateral
                                                                      5 pentagon, 6 hexagon
                                                                      8 octagon, 10 decagon

                                                                      Lines that never cross - PARALLEL
                                                                      Lines that meet or cross - INTERSECTING
                                                                      Lines that form right angles -- PERPENDICULAR

                                                                      Same shape, same size -- CONGRUENT
                                                                      Line that cuts in half - SYMMETRY
                                                                      Up and Down - VERTICAL
                                                                      Left to Right -- HORIZONTAL

                                                                      An angle less than right - ACUTE
                                                                      An angle opened wide - OBTUSE
                                                                      Ninety degrees square corner - RIGHT ANGLE

                                                                      Back to triangles
                                                                      3 sides the same = equilateral
                                                                      2 sides the same = isosceles
                                                                      no sides the same = Hey, that's a scalene right!

                                                                      So, that's it.
                                                                      That's our math song.
                                                                      Before we leave,
                                                                      Remember to read
                                                                      Your math problems three times before you answer.
                                                                      That way you know what the problem
                                                                      Is asking you to do.
                                                                      Don't be lazy, be brilliant.
                                                                      Piece! Like a fraction.

                                                                          Intermediate Algebra | MathHelp.com


                                                                          By MathHelp.com

                                                                          This lesson covers motion problems. Students learn to solve advanced "motion" word problems -- for example, riding a bike to pick up a car and driving back, or biking part of a trip and taking a boat the rest of the trip. Students should first draw a diagram to represent the relationship between the distances involved in the problem, then set up a chart based on the formula rate times time = distance. The chart is then used to set up the equation.

                                                                              Lesson 1 - Multiply Whole Numbers By Fractions (5th Grade Math)


                                                                              By Lumos Learning

                                                                              This is just a few minutes of a complete course. Get all lessons & more subjects at: http://www.MathTutorDVD.com​. In this lesson the student will learn how to multiply a whole number by a fraction and simplify the result.