Grade 3 English Language and Arts - Skill Builder + New York State Test (NYST) Rehearsal Caring Characters & Life's Lessons

Grade 3 English Language and Arts - Skill Builder + New York State Test (NYST) Rehearsal Caring Characters & Life's Lessons

         Get Full Access to Grade 3 English Language and Arts - Skill Builder + New York State Test (NYST) Rehearsal

Currently, you have limited access to Grade 3 English Language and Arts - Skill Builder + New York State Test (NYST) Rehearsal. The Full Program includes,

Buy Practice Resources
SubmitOnline Program

GO BACK

Read the story and answer the question.

Long ago, in a country far away from here, there lived a man who was very dissatisfied with the size of his house. He felt crowded and cramped, elbow to elbow with his wife and their five children. At last, he could stand it no longer and went to see his rabbi.

“It’s miserable in my house. There is no room to turn around! What shall I do?”

“I have just the solution for you,” the rabbi said. “You must move the cow into the house with you.”

“What? That will make a dreadful situation even worse!”

The rabbi shrugged. “Do you want my advice or don’t you?”

“I do want your advice!” said the unhappy man.

“Then you must do exactly as I tell you. Come back next week and let me know what happened.”

In a week, the man returned to the rabbi’s office. “My life is even more miserable than before. My house is so crowded that none of us can turn around. We are stumbling over each other! Please help me!”

“Well,” said the rabbi, “I know the solution, but you must do exactly as I say.”

“Anything!” said the man.

“You must move the pig into the house along with the cow.”

“Surely you’re joking,” said the man. “There is no room for the cow, let alone the pig!”

“You asked for my advice,” said the rabbi. “And now you must do as I tell you.”

The man sighed “All right.”

The next week, the man returned. “Rabbi, my house is unbearable. No one could endure the mooing of the cow, the pig’s oinks, the complaining of my wife and the squabbling of the children!”

“Then there is one more thing to do,” said the rabbi. “Move the goat into the house with you.”

The man did not answer, but sighed as he walked out the door. “I know, I know. I’ll be back next week.”

When the man returned the next week, the rabbi asked if there had been any improvement in his living situation. “You must be joking!” the man said. “No one has ever lived in as much misery as I am experiencing with the bleating of the goat, the oinking of the pig, the mooing of the cow, the squabbling of the children, and the complaining of my wife! It’s beyond human endurance.”

“Then there is only one thing left for you to do,” said the rabbi. “You must bring the chickens into the house with you.”

As the man slumped wearily out the door, the rabbi thought he detected tears in the poor man’s eyes.

The next week, when the householder came to the rabbi’s door, the rabbi asked how things were going at the house. “It’s a madhouse,” replied the man. The chickens squawk, the goat bleats, the pig oinks, the cow moos, my children squabble, and my wife complains.”

“Then you must move all of those animals out of the house and back into the barnyard where they belong!” said the rabbi. “Come back to see me next week.”

When the next week rolled around, the man was whistling as he approached the rabbi’s door. “Well?” asked the rabbi. “How is your living situation now?”

The man smiled. “It is like heaven, Rabbi. Just my wife and our children in our cozy cottage! It is wonderful to have such peace! I am perfectly content.”


What is the lesson, or moral of this story?