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The Battle of the Alamo is often seen as one of or possible even the most significant events to take place during the Texas Revolution. Prior to March 2, 1836, the area we know as the state of Texas was part of the country of the new country of Mexico. Mexico, which included an area called “Spanish Texas”, was formed in 1821 when the Spanish were forced to give up control of the land following the Mexican War for Independence. In order to help bolster their victorious, but sadly crippled army, the Mexican government opened Texas to immigrants from the United States. Settlers wanting to move west to start new lives moved into the area and set up their homes and built towns. Quickly, these new inhabitants became disenchanted with the Mexican government and wanted their own independence. A volunteer army of Texians (white and black immigrants living in Texas) and sympathetic Tejanos (Hispanic Texans wanting independence) was formed. In 1835 a group of these volunteers moved into San Antonio in an attempt to take control over the town from Mexico. After five days of fighting, the Mexican army retreated and the Texians and Tejanos took over the Mexican’s base camp, the Alamo.

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